Gaelic Literature of the Isle of Skye: an annotated  bibliography   

 

Traditional poets and songmakers:  MacLa - MacLeod

 

 

 

 

 

 

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MACLEAN, Alexander.  See MACILLEATHAIN, Alasdair.

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MACLEAN, Anne.  See NICGHILL’EATHAIN, Anna

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MACLEAN, The Bard.  See MACILLEATHAIN, Am Bard

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MACLEAN, Donald (b. 1883).  See MACGHILL’EATHAIN, Domhnall

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MACLEAN, Donald  (20th Century)

 

Donald MacLean was originally from Roag in Skye and later settled in England.

 

(1)  Donald MacLean.  Cuairtear nan Gaidheal.  Nine Gaelic Songs and Five Songs in English.  Melodies and Pianoforte Accompaniments by Andrew J. Orr.  Glasgow: Alex. MacLaren and Song, 1949.  31p.

 

There are actually eight Gaelic songs in this collection.  Of these, all but the first, which celebrates the military prowess of the Gael, are songs of love and exile.  They are pleasant, fairly light songs.  The metres are based upon traditional models, for the greater part a four stress amhran or cumha.  Music is in both notations.

 

i     Cliù na Gillean Gaidhealach’,  pp. 10-11

 

ii    Caisteal nam Fuar Bheann’,  pp. 12-13

 

iii   ‘A’ Chailin Bhòidheach’,  pp. 14-15

 

iv   Cliù na Cailin Sgiatheannaich’,  pp. 16-17

 

v    ‘An t-Eilean Lurach’,  pp. 18-19

 

vi   Cuachag nan Sùil Blàth’,  pp. 20-21

 

vii  ‘Fear a’ Bhreacain’, pp. 22-23

 

viii ‘Ribhinn a’ Ghleann Uachdair’,  pp. 24-25

 

(2)  Donald MacLean.  ‘Eilean mo Rùn’.  Sruth (22nd January 1970), p.7

 

An exile song, similar to those in Cuairtear nan Gaidheal.  Three four-line stanzas and a refrain, beginning ‘O seinnibh cliu do ‘n armunn, gach la be sud mo mhiann’.  A note states that it can be sung to the same air as

Màiri Mhór nan Oran’s ‘Ged tha mo Cheann air liathadh’ and a number of other popular Gaelic songs.  An English translation is given by the Rev. Donald Budge.

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MACLEAN, John (d. 1878).  See MACGILLEATHAIN, Iain (d. 1878)

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MACLEAN (or MACLEOD), John  (19th Century)

 

This poet belonged to Cuidreach.  In Place-Names of Skye (Forbes 1923:130) there is this entry:

 

“COIRE IOMHAIR, COIR’ IOMHAIR.  Ivor’s corry.  John MacLean (or MacLeod), late of Cuidreach, composed a poem of six double verses to this corry (1820-1827):

 

Tha coire shuas ud cho math sa chualas

Bho ‘n Bhaca Ruadh gus an ruig e ‘n Cròn

 

This poem was published in 1880 or thereabout.”

 

Alexander Forbes was probably referring to the poem published in The Highlander (1st September 1877), p. 3 and beginning ‘Mo ghaol Coir’ Iomhair! Bidh h-uile sion ann’. Here the poet’s name is given as MacLeod.

 

Coire Iomhair is in the heart of the Trotternish hills.  It would appear that John MacLean / MacLeod composed his poem upon the model of Donnchadh Bàn’s ‘Oran Coire a’ Cheathaich’.

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MACLEAN, John (20th Century?).  See MACILLEATHAIN, Iain

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MACLEAN, Mary  (18th Century)

 

Mary MacLean, Màiri Nighean Eoghainn, was a daughter of the fourteenth Laird of Coll.  She married in 1761 the Rev. Calum MacAskill of the MacAskills of Rudhan Dùnain in Skye.  It is said that Mary’s real love was a MacLeod of Dunvegan and her family forced her to marry the Rev. Calum against her will.  She and her husband had a large family and among their great-grandchildren was Frances Tolmie, the noted collector of Gaelic song. 

 

In addition to the songs noted below, Mary is said to have composed a lament for her brother Donald who drowned while on a visit to her in Eigg.

 

(Information from Na Baird Leathanach (Sinclair 1898:257-258);  Clan MacLeod Magazine, 17 (1951), 25-26;  Tocher, 10 (Summer 1973), 65-79;  The Old Songs of Skye (Bassin 1977:5-7); Canna (Campbell 1984:228). )

 

(1)  Mary MacLean.  Duanag d’ a Brathair’.  Na Baird Leathanach: the MacLean Bards.  Edited by the Rev. A. MacLean Sinclair.  Vol. 1.  Charlottetown: Haszard and Moore, 1898, p. 258.

 

A song of welcome, beginning ‘Is a thighearnoig chola’, addressed to her brother Donald when he came to visit her.  Four couplets and a refrain of mixed vocables and text.

 

(2)  Chuir mi suas mo ghùn bainnse

 

i     Na Baird Leathanach: the MacLean Bards.  Edited by the Rev. A. MacLean Sinclair.  Vol. 1.  Charlottetown: Haszard and Moore, 1898, p. 258.

 

ii   Tocher,  10 (Summer 1973, 66-67.

 

The fragments of a song said to have been composed by Mary after watching a boat carrying her MacLeod sweetheart sail past Eigg.

 

In a note in his edition of Eachann Bacach and other MacLean Poets Professor Colm Ó Baoill quotes from a letter written by the Rev. A. MacLean Sinclair in 1898 in which he admits to in effect censoring Mary’s song (Ó Baoill 1979: xxxii-xxxiii)  Fortunately the second version listed includes the lines to which Rev. Sinclair took exception.  It is included, along with an English translation and a transcription of the tune, in High MacKinnon’ account of the Rev. Calum MacAskill and his family (Tocher, 10:65-79).

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MACLEAN, Murdoch (19th Century)

 

This poet was from Knockbreak, Waternish, Skye.  There is a possibility that this poet may be the same Murchadh MacIlleathain (q.v.) who composed a poem in praise of the Rev. Donald MacCallum

 

Murdoch MacLean.  ‘Song on the View from Fasach Bridge’.  MacDonald Bards from Mediaeval Times.  Keith Norman MacDonald.  Glasgow: Alex. MacLaren and Sons, 1900, p. 110.

 

A poem which shows the influence of eighteenth century Gaelic nature poetry, with some good descriptions of the place’s natural beauty.  The poet concludes by doubting whether even Donnchadh Bàn would be capable of doing justice to Fasach.

 

Fasach Bridge is on the Waternish Estate, whose owner at the time of the poem’s composition would probably have been Captain Allan MacDonald of the MacDonalds of Belfinlay.  Captain MacDonald bought the estate in 1833.

 

There are sight eight-line stanzas, beginning ‘ ‘S mi ‘n am shuidhe ‘n am ònar’.   The metre could be described as amhran, although there are some irregularities in the internal rhyme.

 

For a more recent song in praise of the Fasach district, see Domhnall MacPhilip’s ‘Coille an Fhàsaich’.

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MACLEAN, Sorley.  See: Somhairle MacGill-Eain

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MACLEOD, - - -  (Early 19th Century)

 

The only information which I have concerning this poet is that given by William MacKenzie in his introduction to the poem noted below.  The composer was a MacLeod and he belonged to Raasay.

 

- - - MacLeod.   ‘ ‘S bochd an naidheachd, ‘s gur brònach’.  Skye:  Iochdar-Trotternish and District.  William MacKenzie.  Glasgow: Alex. MacLaren and Sons, 1930, pp. 38-40.

 

A lament for the victims of a drowning tragedy.  In 1812 a boat with several people on board was returning from Portree to Culnacnoc when it struck the Dubh-sgeir, near Rubha nam Bràithrean.  Sixteen people were lost and

William MacKenzie writes that even at the time of writing (c. 1930) ‘Bàthadh na Dubh-sgeir’ was spoken of with poignant feeling.

 

The part of the lament given here was taken down from a ninety year old man.  There are two introductory stanzas and then five of the victims are named and lamented, stanza by stanza.  With sixteen victims, the original lament could

have had up to nine more stanzas.  The metre is a cumha, with some irregularity of rhyme.

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MACLEOD, Alexander.  (Late 18th / early 19th Century)

 

There is some confusion as to the identity of the composer of the poem noted and discussed below.  He was a MacLeod of Triaslan, in Skye, but there is disagreement as to whether he was named Alexander or Murdo.  I believe the balance of probability to be slightly in favour of his having been Alexander.

 

(1)  Bha mi fhein ‘s mo mhàthair

 

i    Oran le giloag’.  Orain Nuadh Ghaeleach.  Domhnul MacLeoid.  Inbhirnis: Eoin Young, 1811, dd. 72-76.

 

ii    Oran connsachaidh mu ‘n t-suireadh, eidear fear agus a mhàthair’.  Comhchruinneacha do dh’ Orain Taghta Ghaidhealach. Deasaichte le Paruig Mac-an-Tuairneir.  Duneidionn: T. Stiubhard,

1813, dd. 327-330.

 

iii   Alexander M’Leod.  ‘Oran Sugradh’ le Alasdair Og Thriaslain.  Sàr-Obair nam Bàrd Gaelach.  Edited by John MacKenzie.  Edinburgh: MacLachlan and Stewart, 1872 (1st edition, 1841), p. 399.

 

Poem in the form of a dialogue between a mother and her wayward son who had begotten several children out of wedlock.  Blithely unrepentant, the young man cites several biblical precedents for his behaviour and a few more modern ones besides.

 

The composer is not named in the first two versions listed, John MacKenzie being the first to do so.  In a note he writes that the composer was Alexander, one of the MacLeods of Triaslan in Skye, who emigrated to America after begetting several children out of wedlock.  Magnus MacLean contradicts this, writing that the composer was Murdo MacLeod, son of Alexander Macleod of Triaslan, Alasdair Og Thriaslain. Magnus MacLean further notes that one of the poet’s songs, wrongly attributed to his father, appears in John

MacKenzie’s Sàr-Obair (Highland Monthly 5:34).

 

I am inclined to believe that MacKenzie’s identification of the poet may be the correct one, on the basis of two pieces of admittedly very slender evidence  In Aberdeen University Library’s copy of Domhnul MacLeoid’s 

Orain Nuadh Ghaeleach there are pencilled notes in two different hands.  The greater number of these are in one hand and they correspond quite closely to the notes in Sàr-Obair.  The other hand interpolates the

Sàr-Obair ascription to ‘Alasdair Og Thriaslain’.   The second piece of evidence is the ascription of the third version of the song listed below to ‘Alex. M’Leod, Triaslan, Skye’.  While I regard this ascription as being

doubtful, it might be regarded as confirmation of the existence of a poet named Alexander MacLeod of Triaslan.

 

(2)  Oran do Phrionnsa Tearlach

 

i    Oran do Phrionnsa Tearlach’.  Sàr-Obair nam Bàrd Gaelach.  Edited by John MacKenzie.  Edinburgh: MacLachlan and Stewart, 1872 (1st edition, 1841), p. 373.

 

ii    Oran do PhrionnsTearlach’.  MacDonald Bards from Mediaeval Times.  Keith Norman MacDoanld.  Edinburgh: Norman MacLeod, 1900, pp. 117-118.

 

iii   Alex. M’Leod.  Fhleasgaich Oig’.  A’ Choisir-Chiùil.  Paisley: J. and R. Parlane, n.d., p. 48.

 

This song is fully discussed in the section for anonymous poetry and song.  The ascription to Alex. M’Leod of Triaslan with the third version must be treated with caution. 

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MACLEOD, Annie.  See MACLEOID, Mrs. Madsair

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MACLEOD, Archibald.  See MACLEOID, Gilleasbuig

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MACLEOD, Donald.  See: (i) MACLEOID, Domhnall (1698-1759);  (ii) MACLEOID, Domhnall (1787-1873).

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MACLEOD, Cicely (Giles).  See NIGHEAN MHIC GHILLE CHALUIM

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MACLEOD, Jane.  See NICLEOID, Sine

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MACLEOD, Janet.  See NIGHEAN MHIC GHILLE CHALUIM

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MACLEOD, John.  See MACLEOID, Iain

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MACLEOD (or MACLEAN), John  (19th Century)

 

This poet belonged to Cuidreach.  In Place-Names of Skye (Forbes 1923:130) there is this entry:

 

“COIRE IOMHAIR, COIR’ IOMHAIR.  Ivor’s corry.  John MacLean (or MacLeod), late of Cuidreach, composed a poem of six double verses to this corry (1820-1827):

 

Tha coire shuas ud cho math sa chualas

Bho ‘n Bhaca Ruadh gus an ruig e ‘n Cròn

 

This poem was published in 1880 or thereabout.”

 

Alexander Forbes was probably referring to the poem published in The Highlander (1st September 1877), p. 3 and beginning ‘Mo ghaol Coir’ Iomhair! Bidh h-uile sion ann’. Here the poet’s name is given as MacLeod.

 

Coire Iomhair is in the heart of the Trotternish hills.  It would appear that John MacLean / MacLeod composed his poem upon the model of Donnchadh Bàn’s ‘Oran Coire a’ Cheathaich’.

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MACLEOD, Kenneth (1871 – 1955)

 

Born and brought up in Eigg, Kenneth MacLeod was for some time a lay missionary of the Church of Scotland in various places in the Highlands and Islands, before being ordained to the ministry and serving in Colonsay and Gigha.  He retired in 1947 and died in 1955.

 

(Information from Fasti Ecclesiae Scoticane, (4: 69; 8: 323; 9: 392).)

 

During his long life the Rev. Kenneth Macleod was in contact with most of the well-known names in the Gaelic literary world, but perhaps he is best known as the Gaelic collaborator of Marjory Kennedy-Fraser.  Professor Donald MacKinnon proposed him as collaborator to Mrs. Kennedy-Fraser and from the late spring of 1908 he worked with her on the four volumes of Hebridean song detailed below.  The nature and results of that collaboration are discussed in Marjory Kennedy-Fraser’s autobiography A Life of Song (Kennedy-Fraser 1929:

144-153) and in Ethel Bassin’s The Old Songs of Skye: Frances Tolmie and her Circle (Bassin 1977:127-143).  On p. 239 of an article in Scottish Gaelic Studies (12:220-265)), Hamish Robertson quotes Kenneth MacLeod’s own statement that his versions of songs were put together with a view to harmonious effect.  This accords with the picture which emerges from the first two sources quoted, that the Gaelic lyrics contained in Songs of the Hebrides, apart from those actually listed as Kenneth MacLeod’s own compositions, are the result of a very considerable degree of reworking of traditional materials.  They appear too to be very much subordinate to Mrs. Kennedy-Fraser’s musical arrangements, having what Ethel Bassin describes as a ‘period charm’ (Bassin 1977:143).

 

Ethel Bassin appears to believe that Kenneth MacLeod was a willing collaborator in Marjory Kennedy-Fraser’s treatment of traditional Gaelic song, a view which would seem to be supported by Hamish Robertson’s quotation of Kenneth MacLeod’s own words mentioned above.  However, in a review of The Old Songs of Skye Professor Colm Ó Baoill quotes a letter from the late J. L. Campbell in which he told him that in fact Kenneth was unhappy with what Mrs. Kennedy-Fraser was doing, but was persuaded by Donald MacKinnon that if he did not stay on someone less suitable might take his place (Scottish Gaelic Studies, 12, Pt. 1:142).

 

It is against this background that Kenneth MacLeod’s own Gaelic song compositions are to be seen.  In style, form and content those in Songs of the Hebrides are, for the most part, virtually indistinguishable from other material in the series, and indeed it is possible unrealistic to make a distinction between them and those songs in which he is designated as editor, collector etc.  This difficulty is further compounded by the ambiguity of some of the ascriptions; ‘words by Kenneth MacLeod’ being unambiguous enough, but the exact meaning

of phrases such as ‘words contributed by Kenneth MacLeod’ or ‘words from Kenneth MacLeod’ is frequently unclear.  The song lyrics in the Songs of the Hebrides series listed below are those which are indicated as being of Kenneth MacLeod’s own composition, either in whole or in part, but for the reasons which I trust this discussion has made clear, I believe that most of the other material in the series is relevant to a study of MacLeod as a author of song lyrics.

 

Useful information concerning the Rev. Kenneth Macleod’s school and later academic career is to be found on pp. 444-446 of an article by the Rev. T. M. Murchison (TGSI, 52:4-5-459).

 

Entries for the Rev. Kenneth MacLeod are also to be found in this bibliography in the sections for traditional prose, non-traditional creative prose and collections of poetry and song.

 

(1)   Marjory Kennedy-Fraser and Kenneth MacLeod.  Songs of the Hebrides: and Other Celtic Songs from the Highlands of Scotland.  London: Boosey and Co., 1909.

 

Songs whose lyrics are ascribed to Kenneth MacLeod:

 

i     Bruadar Céin’, pp. 23-25

 

ii    Maighdeanan na h-àiridh’, pp. 32-36

 

iii   Gradh geal mo chridh’, pp. 52-54 (the last three stanzas are Kenneth MacLeod’s composition)

 

iv   Tir-nan-òg’, pp. 120-123

 

(2)   Marjory Kennedy-Fraser and Kenneth MacLeod.  Songs of the Hebrides.  Second volume.  London: Boosey and Co., 1917.

 

Songs whose lyrics are ascribed to Kenneth MacLeod:

 

i     ‘M’ eudail, M’ eudail Mac ‘ic Ailean’, pp. 19-22

 

ii    ‘Am Buachaille’, pp. 69-72

 

iii   ‘Long mo Bhruadair’, pp. 120-124

 

iv   ‘An Triall-Bainnse’, pp. 125-129

 

v    ‘Eilean mo Chridh’, pp. 171-177

 

vi   Ruairidh Og’, pp. 185-189 (It is stated that the words are by Kenneth MacLeod after a poem by Mary MacLeod)

 

vii  Aodann Corrabheinn’, pp. 205-211

 

viii ‘Cronan an Easa’, pp. 221-224

 

(3)  Marjory Kennedy-Fraser and Kenneth MacLeod.  Songs of the Hebrides.  Third volume.  London: Boosey and Co., 1921.

 

Songs whose lyrics are ascribed to Kenneth MacLeod:

 

i     Soills’ an Fheamainn’, pp. 10-12 (part of the longer ‘Sea Moods’, pp. 8-13)

 

ii    Bodach Inneschro’, pp. 40-42 (a joint composition with Marjory Kennedy-Fraser)

 

iii   ‘Co bhios agad, Chairistiona’, pp. 54-55

 

iv   ‘An nochd tha Bàta Dol gu Cuan’, pp. 66-69

 

v    Cleite Gàdaig’, pp. 110-113 (second and third stanzas by Kenneth MacLeod)

 

(4)   Marjory Kennedy-Fraser and Kenneth MacLeod.  From the Hebrides: Further Gleanings of Tale and Song.  Glasgow: Paterson’s Publications, [1925].

 

i    Taobh thall a’ Chuilinn’, pp. 26-29

 

ii   ‘Gun cuir sinn nach an Iubhrach’, pp. 30-32

 

iii  Tre Chaol Muile Gaoil’, pp. 33-35

 

iv   ‘Eilean a’ Cheo’, pp. 72-73

 

As well as Gaelic lyrics, Kenneth MacLeod contributed a considerable amount of English-language material to the Songs of the Hebrides series by way of notes, tales, translations of Gaelic lyrics and original English-only

compositions.  A selection from this material, and from his contributions to the Celtic Review, is to be found in his The Road to the Isles: Poetry, Lore and Traditions of the Hebrides (Edinburgh: Robert Grant and Son, 1927).

 

(5)  Coinneach MacLeòid.  Achan an Deòraidh’.  Life and Work: na Duilleagan Gàidhlig (1912: Aireamh 11), 44.

 

Three stanzas, beginning with ‘Tha càch a’ triall d’ an àros fein’, in a cumha metre.  This poem was reprinted three times in Na Duilleagan Gàidhlig (1932: Aireamh 5:4; 1940: Aireamh 5:8; 1950: Aireamh 12:8).

 

(6)  Coinneach MacLeòid.  Betesda, Teach na h-Iochd’.  Life and Work:  na Duilleagan Gàidhlig (1913:Aireamh 7), 28.

 

Seven eight-line stanzas, beginning with ‘Ri taobh Bhetesda mheòraich mi / A liughad ni a dh’ aom’.  This poem was reprinted twice in Na Duilleagan Gàidhlig (1930: Aireamh 10:8;  1932: Aireamh 8:7-8).

 

(7)  Coinneach MacLeòid.  Achan Duthcha’’.  Life and Work: na Duilleagan Gàidhlig (1914: Aireamh 11), 44.

 

Five six-line stanzas, beginning with ‘A Righ nan Dùl / A b’ iùl d’ ar daoin’ o chian’.  Composed at the beginning of the First World War, this poem was reprinted twice in na Duilleagan Gàidhlig (1933: Aireamh 5:7; 1940: Aireamh 4:7).

 

(8) Coinneach MacLeòid.  ‘An Fhuar-Bheinn’.  Tuil: Anthology of 20th Century Scottish Gaelic Verse.  Edited by Ronald M. Black.  Edinburgh: Polygon, 1999 (repr. 2002), pp. 44-45.

 

A lyrical evocation of home.  Three four-line verses beginning ‘A raoir bha mo bhruadar’.  There is a parallel English translation

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MACLEOD, Malcolm.  See GILLE CALUM GARBH MAC GHILLE CHALUIM

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MACLEOD, Mary.  See MAIRI NIGHEAN ALASDAIR RUAIDH

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MACLEOD, Mrs. Major.  See MACLEOID, Mrs. Madsair

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MACLEOD, Murdo (of Triaslan).  See MACLEOD, Alexander (of Triaslan)

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MACLEOD, Murdo (the Skye Soldier).  See MACLEOID, Murchadh

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MACLEOD, Neil (of Clàrsach an Doire).  See MACLEOID, Niall

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MACLEOD, Neil (1825 – 1898).  See MACLEOID, Am Madsair Niall

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MACLEOD, Norman  (1773 – 1858)

 

Norman MacLeod, Tormod Saighdear, was born at Brunal, Minginish, in Skye.  After serving for a time in the army he returned to Scotland and settled in Edinburgh, where he was converted.  He returned to Skye to serve as a Gaelic school teacher and preacher.  After spending some time in Uist he again returned to Skye, where he became involved in the Disruption.  He died at his home in Waternish, aged eighty-five.

 

(Information accompanying Norman MacLeod’s three poems in The Men of Skye (MacCowan 1902:65-79).)

 

Roderick MacCowan.  The Men of Skye.  Glasgow: John MacNeilage, 1902, pp. 79-80.

 

i    Ged bu leamsa Minginish 

 

This poem’s theme is the supremacy of the love of Christ over love of the world, here represented by Minginish with all its natural beauty.  It is interesting to compare it with secular poems of homeland and exile.  There is an English translation.

 

Only twelve lines are given: arranged in an eight-lined and a four-line stanza.

 

ii   Ochan Fhir mhoir co tha urad ruit?’

 

Two lines were all that Roderick MacCowan was able to glean of a hymn which Tormod Saighdear composed about the Saviour.

 

iii  Gur mise tha gu truagh

 

Composed when he and his fellow teacher, Alexander Munro, were in Minginish (op. cit., pp. 156-157).  There are three six-line stanzas in a form of strophic verse.

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MACLEOD, Norman  (1745 – 1824)

 

Norman MacLeod was the eldest son of Donald MacLeod, ‘Gobha Shuardail’, tacksman of Swordale in Skye.  Licensed to preach by the Presbytery of Skye in 1771, he was ordained as minister of Morvern in 1775.  He was an eloquent preacher in Gaelic.  His second eldest son, also Norman, was the famous ‘Caraid nan Gaidheal’. 

 

(Information from Gaelic Bards from 1775 to 1825 (Sinclair 1896:11);  ‘The MacLeods of Morvern’ by ‘Fionn’ (Celtic Monthly, 16:145-146);  Fasti Ecclesiae Scoticane (Scott 1923:117).)

 

(1)  Tha sgeula ri aithris

 

i    Oran a rinn duine uasal airrit, do dhuine uasal ele’.  Comh-chruinneachidh Orannaigh Gaidhealach.  Le Raonuill MacDomhnuill [The Eigg Collection].  Duneidiunn: Walter Ruddiman, 1776, dd. 339-340.

 

ii   Tormaid Mac Leoid.  Suiridh Ruari’.  The Gaelic Bards from 1775 to 1825.  Edited by the Rev. A. MacLean Sinclair.  Sydney, C.B.:  Mac-Talla, 1896, pp. 11-13.

 

It will be noted that the first version is not ascribed to the Rev. Norman MacLeod.  However, Magnus MacLean, writing some four years before the publication of the second version, ascribes this poem to him, as well as the one noted and discussed below (Highland Monthly, 4:754).

 

There is no indication as to the identity of the Ruairidh to whom the poem is addressed and the poet’s attitude to him is ambivalent.  The second version shows some textual variations from the first, but it seems likely that the Rev. A. MacLean Sinclair used the Eigg Collection as his source.

 

There are four twelve-line stanzas.  The metrical structure is complex, with elements of both strophic and quatrain forms.

 

(2)  Oran leis an duine uasal cheudna gabhail a chead do ‘n Eilan-Sgionnach ‘s ga chairdin’.  Comh-chruinneachidh Orannaigh Gaidhealach.  Le Raonuill MacDomhnuill [The Eigg Collection].  Duneidiunn: Walter Ruddiman, 1776, dd. 341-342.

 

This begins as the song of a departing exile, and then becomes a praise song for MacLeod of Talisker.  This must be Colonel MacLeod, IV of Talisker, who died in 1798.  Colonel MacLeod is the subject of a lament by Raonull Domhnullach, Raonull Mac Iain ‘ic Eobhainn.

 

It will be noted that this poem is unascribed in the Eigg Collection, but Captain Simon Fraser gives the tune as No. 161 in his Airs and Melodies …, and in a note ascribes the poem to the Rev. MacLeod (Fraser 1816: 76, 115).  Magnus MacLean also ascribes it to him (Highland Monthly, 4:754).

 

There are five twelve-line stanzas, beginning ‘Mi am shuidhe an deiridh bàtaigh’.  Each stanza has three four-line units with a strophic construction.

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MACLEOD, Paul.  See POL CRUBACH

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MACLEOD, Roderick  (19th Century)

 

Brother of Major Neil MacLeod (q.v.).  Composer of poem ‘Glaodh nan Croitearan’.  Informant of Magnus MacLean when the latter was researching his ‘Skye Bards’ (Highland Monthly, 5:99).  I have been unable to trace publication of ‘Glaodh nan Croitearan’.

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Abbreviations 

 

Traditional: known authorship

A-C       D-Domhnall       Domhnallach-Dz        E–G       H–L       M–MacA       MacB–MacC        MacD        MacE-MacK,  MacLa-MacLeod        MacLeòid A-H        MacLeòid I-Z        MacM-MacN       MacO-MacZ      M      N      O-Q      R-Z

 

Traditional: anonymous

A-B      C-D      E-K      L-N       O       P-Z     

 

Traditional: collections

Annie Arnott       An Cabairneach        Carmina Gadelica        Catriona Dhùghlas        Tormod Domhnallach                  Marjory Kennedy-Fraser         Angus Lamont        K. N. MacDonald         Johan MacInnes          Hugh MacKinnon          Calum I. MacLean         Sorley MacLean        Kenneth MacLeod         Niall MacLeòid        Màiri Nighean Alasdair

Cairistiona Mhàrtainn         Alexander Morison          Kenneth Morrison         Angus Nicolson          Portree HS Magazine   Lachlann Robertson         Frances Tolmie I          Frances Tolmie II

 

Modern

Somhairle MacGill-Eain         The New Poetry

 

References

Books etc: A-L         Books etc: MacA-MacL         Books etc: MacM-Z   Periodicals, MSS, AV

 

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