Gaelic Literature of the Isle of Skye: an annotated  bibliography   

 

Traditional poetry and song:  collectors and collections

 

 

 

 

 

 

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MACLEOID, Niall  (1843-1913)

 

Perhaps the most popular Gaelic poet of the nineteenth century, Niall MacLeòid was born in Glendale, Skye, a son of the poet Domhnall MacLeòid, Domhnall nan Oran. For details of him, see his entry in the section for Poetry and Song of Known Authorship.

 

It is reasonable to assume that Niall MacLeòid was possessed of a good store of oral literature, having been born and brought up in Skye when the oral tradition was still strong, and it is a matter of regret that he committed so little of this material to print. 

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C’àit an caidil an nighneag an nochd?’

 

i     The Highlander (7th March 1879), p. 6

 

ii    The Celtic Garland.  Edited by ‘Fionn’.  Glasgow: Archibald Sinclair, 1881, pp. 221-223

 

For other versions of Iain MacCuithein’s song see entry for Iain MacCuithein in the section for poetry and song of known authorship.

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Crodh Chailein

 

A version of this song in Frances Tolmie’s Collection (Journal of the Folk-Song Society 16:243-244) includes in the notes details from Niall MacLeòid of a legend concerning the origin of the song.

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‘Cumha Rarsaidh

 

Beagan Dhuilleag bho Sheann Bhàrdachd Eilean a’ Cheò’ by Niall MacLeòid (TGSI, 21:171-186). 

 

This article includes on pp. 12-13 twelve stanzas of Lady D’Oyly’s song.  Introductory notes indicate that he was unaware of the existence of the two other published versions of this poem.  His version shows several variations

from these and may represent a version from oral tradition..  See entry for Lady D’Oyly in the section for poetry and song of known authorship.

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‘Mo roghainn ‘s mo run a Chunna mi ‘n de’

 

The Highlander (19th August 1876), p. 3

 

One of the versions of this anonymous song collected by Niall.  See entry in the section for anonymous poetry and song.

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Oran an Uisge-bheatha

 

Beagan Dhuilleag bho Sheann Bhàrdachd Eilean a’ Cheò’ by Niall MacLeòid (TGSI, 21:173-175)

 

This article includes on pp. 173-175 a version of the song by Raonull Domhnallach of Minginish. See entry for Raonull Domhnallach in the section for poetry and song of known authorship.

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‘Tàladh MhicLeòid’ / ‘Tàladh na Mnà-Sìdhe

 

i    An Gaidheal, 1 (1872), 235-236.

 

ii   Celtic Magazine, 11 (1885-1886), 365-366.

 

iii   Journal of  the Folk-Song Society, 16 (1911) [The Frances Tolmie Collection], 174-177.

 

iv   TGSI, 39 (1919-1922), 133-135.

 

A lullaby traditionally associated with the infant heirs of the MacLeods of Dunvegan.  For other versions of this song see entry in the section for anonymous poetry and song.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Abbreviations 

 

Traditional: known authorship

A-C       D-Domhnall       Domhnallach-Dz        E–G       H–L       M–MacA       MacB–MacC        MacD        MacE-MacK,  MacLa-MacLeod        MacLeòid A-H        MacLeòid I-Z        MacM-MacN       MacO-MacZ      M      N      O-Q      R-Z

 

Traditional: anonymous

A-B      C-D      E-K      L-N       O       P-Z     

 

Traditional: collections

Annie Arnott       An Cabairneach        Carmina Gadelica        Catriona Dhùghlas        Tormod Domhnallach                  Marjory Kennedy-Fraser         Angus Lamont        K. N. MacDonald         Johan MacInnes          Hugh MacKinnon          Calum I. MacLean         Sorley MacLean        Kenneth MacLeod         Niall MacLeòid        Màiri Nighean Alasdair

Cairistiona Mhàrtainn         Alexander Morison          Kenneth Morrison         Angus Nicolson          Portree HS Magazine   Lachlann Robertson         Frances Tolmie I          Frances Tolmie II

 

Modern

Somhairle MacGill-Eain         The New Poetry

 

References

Books etc: A-L         Books etc: MacA-MacL         Books etc: MacM-Z   Periodicals, MSS, AV

 

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© A. Loughran, 2016