Gaelic Literature of the Isle of Skye: an annotated  bibliography   

 

Traditional anonymous poetry and song:  Individual items P - Z

 

 

 

 

 

 

This page is best viewed on a desktop or laptop PC

 

‘ ‘Phiuthrag nam Piuthar’.  See: The Frances Tolmie Collection II

____________

 

Poca sìl an t-sealgair’.  See: The Frances Tolmie Collection II

____________

 

‘Port Dhomhnaill Mhic Guthagain’/  See: The Keith Norman MacDonald Collection (Gesto Collection; Puirt-a-Beul)

____________

 

Pòsadh Piuthar Iain Bhàin

 

Sorley MacLean refers on p. 390 of his ‘Some Raasay Traditions’ (TGSI, 49:377-397) to a belief that this song originated in Raasay.

____________

 

Rachainn ‘n ad chòmhail’.  See: The Johan MacInnes Collection

____________

 

An raoir chunna mi ‘n aisling’.  See: ‘Fear Bhalai’ in the Frances Tolmie Collection I

____________

 

Ruidhlidh na coilich dhubha’.  See: The Keith Norman MacDonald Collection (Puirt-a-Beul)

____________

 

‘ ‘S a’ choillud thall’.  See: ‘Fàill ill o-ho-ro’ in the Frances Tolmie Collection I

____________

 

‘ ‘S aighearach mi’.  See: The Frances Tolmie Collection II

____________

 

‘ ‘S ann mu ‘n taca so ‘n

 

i     Orain Nuadh Ghaelach.  Domhnul MacLeoid.  Inbhirnis: Eoin Young, 1811, dd. 237-239.

 

ii    Mac-talla nan Tur.  Edited by the Rev. A. MacLean Sinclair.  Sydney, C.B.: Mac-Talla Publishing Co., 1901, pp. 107-108.

 

iii   Gaelic Songs in Nova Scotia.  Edited by Helen Creighton and Calum MacLeod.  Ottawa: Dept. of the Secretary of State, 1964, pp. 90-92.

 

A lament for a young smith who met a violent end.  All these printed versions attribute it to his sister.  However, Dr. Donald Smith’s 1776 MS (NLS MS 14876) Has a version attributed to the victim’s brother, a fellow smith.

 

The evidence for a Skye origin for this song is somewhat tenuous: the second version has a reference to the heir of MacDonald of Sleat.  The MS version referred to above has two lines with a Skye reference: ‘Sin is càirdeas fear ùr /

Thig bho Dhorni o‘n Dhuntuilm’.

 

References to the dead man having been in Montrose’s army and having been killed by Alasdair mac Cholla are only to be found in the text of the second version.  This has a number of stanzas not found in any of the other versions:

vidence perhaps of MacLean Sinclair’s having inserted some material of his own composition.  The third version carries a note to the effect that the singer from whom this version came said that the lament was for a young MacLeod

who had been in Montrose’s army and had been killed by a son of Alasdair Mac Cholla.  However, I think that the singer may have been influenced in this by the Mac-Talla version.

____________

 

‘ ‘S ann tha ‘n còmhradh binn aig an fhitheach’.  See: The Annie Arnott Collection

____________

 

‘ ‘S ann thug mi ‘n gaol do ‘n cruinneig dhonn’.  See: ‘Mo Chruinneag Dhonn

____________

 

‘ ‘S ‘n do dh’ fhàg thu Niall a Chaisteil

 

Éigse, 7 (1953-1955), 227.

 

Twelve half-lines, with a vocable refrain, of a Skye rendering of the Barra Boasting.  From James Ross’s article ‘The Sub-literary Tradition in Scottish Gaelic Song-poetry’, Part 1 (Éigse, 7:217-235).

____________

 

Seachd Sgadain’.  See: The Kenneth Morrison Collection

____________

 

Seallaibh curaigh Eoghainn.  See: The Annie Arnott Collection

____________

 

‘Seathan Mac Rìgh Eireann

 

i     Journal of the Folk-Song Society, 16 (1911) [The Frances Tolmie Collection], 207-208.

 

ii    Songs of the Hebrides.  Edited by Marjory Kennedy-Fraser and Kenneth MacLeod.  Vol. 2.  London: Boosey and Co., 1917, pp. 73-79.

 

iii   Carmina Gadelica.  Vol. 5.  Edited by Angus Matheson.  Edinburgh: Oliver and Boyd, 1954, pp. 60-83.

 

This song has been widely known throughout the Highlands and Islands.  J. L. Campbell has given details of the various MS and printed versions (Campbell and Collinson, 1977:196-200).  The versions listed above are all from Skye and Eigg.

 

The first version was noted by Frances Tolmie from Mary Ross of Kilmoluag, Skye in 1899.  Only two lines and a vocable refrain are given, beginning with ‘ ‘S mairg thubhairt riumsa gu ‘m bu bhean shubhach mi’.  The air and words

of the second version were collected by Kenneth MacLeod from Janet MacLeod of Eigg and Mary Henderson of Morvern.

 

The third (Carmina Gadelica) version is accompanied by Alexander Carmichael’s introductory notes (pp. 61-63), the transcript of a conversation about the song which took place in Eigg in January 1905 between Alexander Carmichael, Kenneth MacLeod and Janet MacLeod (pp. 62-65), Janet MacLeod’s version of the song (pp. 66-79), eighteen lines from Mary Henderson of Morvern (pp. 78-81) and thirty lines from Jessie Matheson of Kilmuir, Skye.

 

Janet MacLeod’s version has one hundred and ninety-two lines, beginning with ‘ ‘S mairg a chual e …’, with a vocable refrain.  Professor Derick Thomson gives an interesting view of the song’s style and sixteenth century origin (Thomson 1977:75-76, 81-82).  Janet MacLeod regarded ‘Seathan’ as ‘roghainn nan òran luathaidh’ (the choice of waulking songs) and said that what she remembered of it was only a fraction of what she knew in her youth (Matheson 1954:62-63).

____________

 

‘ ‘S e mo leanabh mingeileisach, maingeileisach’.  See: ‘Taladh Mhic Leoid

____________

 

‘ ‘S e ‘n sgeul a fhuair mi ‘n drasta’.  See: ‘Cumha do dh’ Iain og Scalpa

____________

 

Seo a’ bhliadhna dh’ fhàg mi dubhrach

 

TGSI, 49 (1974-1976), 391

 

From Sorley MacLean’s article ‘Some Raasay Traditions’ (TGSI, 49:377-397).   Fragment of a lament learnt from his aunt, Peggie MacLean.  Seven lines and a vocable refrain.

____________

 

‘ ‘S fad’ tha mi ‘m ònaran’.  See: The Frances Tolmie Collection II

____________

 

‘ ‘Fhada bhuam a chì mi ‘n ceò’.  See: ‘Tàladh an Leinibh Hearaich’ in the Kenneth MacLeod Collection

____________

 

‘ ‘S gur e Diùram mac ‘ighne ni’ Lachlainn ‘ic Ruari’.  See: ‘Diùram’

____________

 

Sheinneadh e puirt is uirt is cruitean’.  See: ‘Gaisgeach na Sgéithe Deirge’ in the Kenneth MacLeod Collection

____________

 

Shibeag, Shibeag’.  See: The Kennedy-Fraser Collection (Songs of the Hebrides 2), and The Frances Tolmie Collection II

____________

 

Shiubhlainn moch leat, shiubhlainn ana-moch’.  See: ‘Oran do Phrionnsa Teàrlach

____________

 

‘Shiùbhlainn, Shiùbhlainn’.   See: The Frances Tolmie Collection II

____________

 

‘ ‘S i bhliadhna ùras thug am beum orm’.  See: Marbh-rann do Mhaistir Donull MacCuinn

____________

 

Sil a bhò’.  See: The Kennedy-Fraser Collection (From the Hebrides)

____________

 

‘ ‘Si mo Ghaolach-sa bhann’.  See: ‘Caoidh Leannain’ in the Frances Tolmie Collection I

____________

 

‘ ‘S i  Mórag, ‘S i  Mórag’.  See: The Keith Norman MacDonald Collection (Puirt-a-beul)

____________

 

Siod mar rachainn fhéin is tu’.  See: The Calum I. MacLean Collection

____________

 

Siud a leinibh’.  See: The Frances Tolmie Collection II

____________

 

Slan gu ‘n tig Aonachan’.  See: The Frances Tolmie Collection II

____________

 

‘ ‘S mairg a chual e nach do dh’ innis e’.   See: ‘Seathan Mac Rìgh Eireann

____________

 

‘ ‘S mairg thubhairt riumsa gu ‘m bu bhean shubhach mi’.  See: ‘Seathan Mac Rìgh Eireann

____________

 

‘ ‘S Milis Mórag’

 

i     Journal of the Folk-Song Society, 16 (1911) [The Frances Tolmie Collection], 169.

 

ii    TGSI, 49 (1974-1976), 390.

 

A lullaby.  The first version was noted by Frances Tolmie from Mary Ross of Kilmoluag in Skye.  It has two short verses and a refrain, with the tune in staff notation and an English translation.  The second version is from Sorley

MacLean’s article ‘Some Raasay Traditions’ (TGSI, 49:377-397), and has the refrain only, learnt from his aunt Peggie MacLean.  For a Barra version, see Songs of the Hebrides (Kennedy-Fraser and MacLeod 1909:390).

____________

 

‘ ‘S mis’ a chunnaic’.  See: ‘Oran mu ‘n Ghruagaich-mhara’ in the Frances Tolmie Collection II

____________

 

Soraidh no dhà le dùrachd bhuam’.  See: ‘Oran a rinneadh do dh’ William Brathair Mhic Leod na Hearradh

____________

 

‘ ‘S toigh leam Ailean Dubh a Lochaidh’.  See: The Kennedy-Fraser Collection (Songs of the Hebrides 2), and The Calum I. MacLean Collection

____________

 

‘S toigh leam cruinneag dhonn nam

 

Gaelic Songs of Skye.  Cairistìona Mhàrtainn.  Taigh na Teud: An t-Eilean Sgitheanach, 2001, p. 87.

 

Often sung in Trotternish as a waulking song.  Seven couplets and a three-line refrain from Catrìona NicDhòmhnaill of Linacro, with four additional couplets.

____________

.

‘ S tràth chuir a’ ghrian’.  See: The Frances Tolmie Collection II

____________

 

‘ ‘S truagh leam fhìn’.  See: The Kennedy-Fraser Collection (From the Hebrides)

____________

 

‘ ‘S ùr a’ choill bho ‘n d’ rinn i fàs

 

Skye: Iochdar-Trotternish and District.  William MacKenzie.  Glasgow:  Alex. MacLaren and Sons, 1930, pp. 103-104.

 

One of several songs celebrating the 19th century elopement of Donald MacDonald of Monkstadt in Skye and Jessie MacDonald of Balranald in North Uist.  Three four-line verses in a strophic metre.  See also ‘Fàilte dhuit, deagh shlàinte leat’ and ‘Nuair fhuair an “Eliza” ‘.

____________

 

‘Tàladh an Leinibh Hearaich’.  See: The Kenneth MacLeod Collection

____________

 

‘Tàladh an Leinibh Leòdaich’.  See: ‘Tàladh Mhic Leòid

____________

 

‘Tàladh Choinnich Oig

 

Scottish Studies, 7 (1963), 226-230.

 

Fragment of a song recorded in 1953 from Duncan Grant of Broadford, Skye.  Dr. John MacInnes discusses other published versions of the song, as well as manuscript ones and concludes that subject of the lullaby is Kenneth, the fourth Earl of Seaforth, who succeeded to the title in 1676.  Duncan Grant’s version here has a vocable refrain and five quatrains, beginning with ‘O Mhic Choinnich na stròl farsuinn’.

____________

 

‘Tàladh Dhòmhnaill Ghuirm’

 

i      An Gaidheal, 5 (1876), 68-70.

 

ii    The Gesto Collection of Highland Music.  Compiled by Keith Norman MacDonald.  Leipzig: For the compiler, 1895, App., p. 20.

 

iii   Journal of the Folk-Song Society, 16 (1911) [The Frances Tolmie Collection], 238-239.

 

iv   The MacDonald Collection of Gaelic Poetry.  Edited by the Revs. A. and A. MacDonald.  Inverness: Northern Counties, 1911, pp. 35-39.

 

v     Songs of the Hebrides.  Edited by Marjory Kennedy-Fraser and Kenneth MacLeod.  Vol. 2.  London: Boosey and Co., 1917, pp. 28-30.

 

vi   Bàrdachd Ghàidhlig.  Edited by William J. Watson.  2nd. ed.  Stirling: Learmonth and Son, 1932 [1st. ed. 1918], pp. 246-249.

 

vii  Orain Luaidh Màiri Nighean Alasdair.  Air an Cruinneachadh le K. C. Craig.  Glasgow: Alasdair Matheson, [1949], pp. 11-12.

 

viii  Gairm, 7 (An t-Earrach 1954), 239-241.

 

ix    Hebridean Folksongs.  Edited by J. L. Campbell.  Musical transcriptions by Francis Collinson.  Vol. 1.  Oxford: Clarendon, 1977, pp. 128-131, 238-239, 325-326.

 

x    An Anthology of Scottish Women Poets.  Edited by Catherine Kerrigan; Gaelic translations by Meg Bateman.  Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 1991, 18-23, 336.

 

xi   Gàir nan Clàrsach.  Edited by Colm Ó Baoill; translated by Meg Bateman.  Edinburgh: Birlinn, 1994, pp. 66-69.  With parallel English translation and notes.

 

xii  Orain an Eilein: Gaelic Songs of Skye.  Cairistìona Mhàrtainn.  Taigh na Teud: An t-Eilian Sgitheanach, 2001, p. 78

 

Composed to Domhnall Gorm of Sleat and traditionally attributed to his foster mother.  Several chiefs of the MacDonalds of Sleat were known as Domhnall Gorm.  The editors of the MacDonald Collection, W. J. Watson and Derick Thomson all believed that the Domhnall Gorm in question was Domhnall Gorm Mór who died in 1617 (MacDonald 1911: xii;  Watson 1932: 334;  Thomson 1977: 59), but J. L. Campbell believed that he may have been

Domhnall Gorm Og, who died in 1643 (Campbell and Collinson 1977: 238).

 

J. L. Campbell discusses the various versions of ‘Tàladh Dhomhnaill Ghuirm’ in his notes to the ninth version listed above, but he does not mention the second version, that in the Gesto Collection.  I believe it very likely that the source of this version is Frances Tolmie and that it is part of the version which she collected from Harriet MacVicar in North Uist in 1870, part of which is in her 1911 collection (see third version above).

 

Most of the texts listed above have a Uist provenance, except for the fourth and the fifth.  The source of the former was Frances Tolmie, who according to the editors (p. xii) ‘took it down in Skye’.  The source of the latter was Kenneth

MacLeod, which may give it an Eigg provenance.

 

Tunes are given in staff notation for versions, two, three, five, eight and nine.

____________

 

‘Tàladh Mhic Leòid

 

i     An Gaidheal, 1 (1872), 235-236.

 

ii    Celtic Magazine, 11 (1885-1886), 365-366.

 

iii   Waifs and Strays of Celtic Tradition.  No. 5.  Rev. John Gregorson Campbell.  London: David Nutt, 1895, pp. 141-147. 

 

iv   Puirt mo Sheanmhar.  Air an cruinneachadh le [T. D. MacDhomhnaill].  Struibhle: Aonghas MacAoidh, 1907, d. 5.

 

v    Folk Tales and Fairy Lore.  Collected by Rev. James MacDougall.  Edinburgh: John Grant, 1910, pp. 109-111.

 

vi   Journal of the Folk-Song Society, 16 (1911) [The Frances Tolmie Collection], 174-177.

 

vii  TGSI, 39 (1919-1922), 133-135.

 

viii Carmina Gadelica.  Vol. 5.  Edited by Angus Matheson.  Edinburgh: Oliver and Boyd, 1954, pp. 184-225.

 

A lullaby traditionally associated with the infant heirs of the MacLeods of Dunvegan.  The source of the first, second, sixth and seventh versions is Niall MacLeòid, author of Clàrsach an Doire.  He gives an account of the legend according to which the song was first sung by a fairy woman to MacLeod’s infant heir. The sixth and seventh versions are identical, but the first and second show some variations.  The fourth and fifth versions are very similar to the Niall MacLeòid versions and have probably been derived from them.

 

The third version was given to the Rev. John Gregorson Campbell by J. F. Campbell of Islay. 

 

Carmina Gadelica has several versions of the lullaby, but the editor notes that not all are fairy lullabies, nor are they all especially associated with MacLeod.  On pp. 184-189 there is a version from the Rev. Kenneth MacLeod which is quite close to Niall MacLeòid’s version.  On pp. 218-225 there is a version preceded on pp. 216-219 by two accounts of the song’s origin, one of which is from Domhnall MacCuithein of Fernilea in Skye.  Apart from a brief fragment on

p. 210, there is no indication of a Skye origin for the remainder of the material.

 

The first version listed above begins with ‘ ‘S e mo leanabh mingileiseach, maingileiseach’.  The other versions discussed have similar opening lines, except that on p. 218 of Carmina Gadelica, which begins with ‘Bocan beag odhar thu’.  All versions, except the first, second and fourth listed have English translations.  The version in Frances Tolmie’s Collection has the tune in staff notation.

____________

 

‘Tàladh na Bean Shìth’.  See: ‘Tàladh Mhic Leòid

____________

 

‘Tàladh na Mna-Sìdh’.  See: ‘Tàladh Mhic Leòid

____________

 

an teaghlach air fàs tana’.  See: ‘Cumha Lachlainn Màrtainn’

____________

 

Teachd Leòid’.  See: The Kenneth MacLeod Collection

____________

 

Tha Chu’ag is “gug-gùgaice’.  See: The Frances Tolmie Collection II

____________

 

Tha Gruagach ‘san Aodan’.  See: The Keith Norman MacDonald Collection (Gesto Collection)

____________

 

‘Thàinig easlainte throm, throm’.  See: ‘Laoidh Fhraoich’

____________

 

Thàine tus’ a Chuilein rùnaich’.  See: ‘ , lail ó’ in the Frances Tolmie Collection II

____________

 

Tha mi air mo chuir ‘s an talamh’.  See: The Keith Norman MacDonald Collection (Puirt-a-Beul)

____________

 

Tha mi ‘cur mar chroisean ‘s mar gheasan ort’.  See: ‘An Tuairisgeal’

____________

 

Tha mi fo chùram’.  See entry for Anna NicGhilleathain  in section for poetry and song of known authorship

____________

 

Tha mìle long an cuan Eirinn’.   See: The Kennedy-Fraser Collection (From the Hebrides)

____________

 

Tha mi ‘n dùil, tha mi ‘n dùil’.  See: ‘Tha mo dhùil, tha mo dhùil

____________

 

Tha mi sgìth ‘s mi leam fhìn’.  See: Buain na Rainich

____________

 

Tha mo bhreacan fliuch fo ‘n dìle

 

TGSI, 52 (1980-1982), 188-189.

 

From Neil J. MacKinnon’s article ‘Strath, Skye – the End of the Nineteenth Century’ (TGSI, 52:155-197).  This version has no verses which cannot be related to verses in other printed versions of the song, although unlike them it has no specific references to home.  According to an accompanying note it was composed by a Strathaird man who had been abroad with the army before returning to fight for Prince Charlie.  There are seven verse-couplets and a refrain.

 

Tha mo bhreacan fliuch fo ‘n dìle’ seems to have enjoyed wide popularity throughout the Gaidhealtachd and printed versions of it have appeared in numerous publications.  In the Sound Archives of the School of Scottish Studies in the University of Edinburgh there are several versions recorded in Skye alone.  According to the Rev. Tormod Domhnallach, a Kilmoluag poet known as ‘Am Maor Beag’ was responsible for the Skye version of the song,

and the original version was composed by a native of Glenlochy.

____________

 

Tha mo chridhe brùite briste’.   See: The Catriona Dhùghlas Collection

____________

 

Tha mo dhùil, tha mo dhùil

 

i     An Duanaire.  Edited by Donald MacPherson.  Edinburgh: MacLachlan and Stewart, 1868, pp. 71-72.

 

ii   The Gesto Collection of Highland Music.  Compiled by Keith Norman MacDonald.  Leipzig: for the compiler, 1895,  App. p. 56.

 

iii   Celtic Monthly, 9 (1900-1901), 239.

 

iv   Orain an Eilein : Gaelic Songs of Skye.  Cairistiona Mhàrtainn.  An t-Eilean Sgitheanach: Taigh na Teud, 2001, p.100.

 

The first version has seven quatrains and a refrain.  The third version is textually identical to the first and has the tune in tonic sol-fa notation.  The second version has four quatrains and a refrain with a tune different to that for version three.  According to Calum Ruadh MacNeacail, the composer was a Skye soldier fighting in the Peninsular War (MacNeacail 1978:1) and this is supported by internal evidence in the song itself.  The fourth version is from Eòin

Dòmhnallach and has four quatrains and a refrain.

____________

 

Tha mo shealgair ‘na shìneadh’.  See: ‘Bràigh Uige’

____________

 

Tha ‘m pilot ship a’ dol a sheòladh

 

An Deò-Gréine, 1 (1905-1906), 48.

 

Song learnt by John Cameron in Ballachulish from a seafaring man, ‘probably a Skyeman’.  Five lines, with the tune in tonic sol-fa notation.

____________

 

Tha na féidh an bràigh Uige’.  See: ‘Bràigh Uige’

____________

 

Tha na féidh, o ho!’.  See: The Frances Tolmie Collection II

____________

 

Tha ‘n crodh-laoigh ‘s an fhraoch’.  See: The Frances Tolmie Collection II

____________

 

Tha sgeul ùr air tighinn do ‘n bhaile’.  See the Calum I. MacLean Collection; and ‘Hi ri ‘m bo, hi ri hi ù’.

____________

 

Tha sìor chaoineadh an Beinn-Dorain’.  See: The Frances Tolmie Collection II

____________

 

Tha smeòrach ‘s a’ mhaduinn chiùin’.  See: The Kennedy-Fraser Collection (Songs of the Hebrides 3); and The Keith Norman MacDonald Collection.

____________

 

Tha sneachd air na beannaibh Diùrach’.  See: The Frances Tolmie Collection II

____________

 

Tha toll air a’ bhàta’.  See: The Keith Norman MacDonald Collection (Puirt-a-Beul)

____________

 

Theàrlaich òig a’ chuailein chiataich’.  See: ‘Oran do Phrionnsa Teàrlach

____________

 

Théid mi null thar a’ Bheinn’.  See: The Keith Norman MacDonald Collection (Puirt-a-Beul)

____________

 

Thog am bàta na siùil’.  See: The Frances Tolmie Collection II

____________

 

Thograinn, thograinn bhith dol dhachaidh

 

Orain an Eilein: Gaelic Songs of Skye.  Cairistìona Mhàrtainn.  Taigh na Teud: An t-Eilian Sgitheanach, 2001, p. 83

 

What would appear to be a old song about Scorrybreck and the Nicolsons.  It also has a reference to King James V.  Six couplets, where each line is followed by a line of vocables and the second line of each couplet forms the first line of the following couplet.  Words and tune from Seonag NicLeòid.

____________

 

Thoir mo choraidh a Chinn t-sàile’.  See: ‘Hi hil hil é ó’ in the Calum I. MacLean Collection

____________

 

Thréig an cadal mi’

 

Carmina Gadelica.  Vol. 4.  Edited by James Carmichael Watson.  Edinburgh: Oliver and Boyd, 1941, pp. 352-355.

 

Poem noted from Bean Aonghuisic Lachlainn of Acha-Da-Dheardail in Eigg.  Her mother had been a servant in the house of Raonuill Macdomhnuill,  compiler of the Eigg Collection (1776).  The poem appears to have been composed to a chief who was away at war.  There are four stanzas in irregular snéadhbhairdne metre.  There is a parallel English translation.

____________

 

‘Thug an dithis dh’ an ainnir gaol’.  See: ‘Duaran agus Coll’ in the Kenneth Morrison Collection

____________

 

‘Thug mi gaol duit, Thug mi gràdh duit’.  See: Oran Sniomha’ in the Kennedy-Fraser Collection (Songs of the Hebrides 1)

____________

 

‘Thug mi rùn, ‘s chuir mi ùigh’.  See: ‘Nighean Bhàn Ghrùlainn

____________

 

Tilg an dearg air Tarmaid dubh

 

Carmina Gadelica.  Vol. 2.  Edited by Alexander Carmichael.  Edinburgh: T. and A. Constable, 1900, pp. 308-309.  2nd. ed.  Edinburgh: Oliver and Boyd, 1928, pp. 329-331.

 

From the recitation of Donald MacCuithein of Fernilea, Skye.  Ten lines of rhythmical incantation said to have been made by the fairies of Dun Gharsain in Bracadale when their fairy fort was destroyed by a local man who took its

stones for building.  There is an English translation, as well as Donald MacCuithein’s account of the destruction of the fort.  For another version of the tale, see Otta Swire’s Skye: the Island and its Legends (Swire 1967:163-164).

____________

 

‘Till an crodh Dhonnachaidh’.  See: The Frances Tolmie Collection II

____________

 

Togaibh è, togaibh è.  See: The Frances Tolmie Collection II

____________

 

Tòir air na Tuathach’.  See: The Alexander Morison Collection

____________

 

‘Na Trì Eòin.  See: The Frances Tolmie Collection II

____________

 

An Tràigh-shìolag’.  See: The Kenneth MacLeod Collection

____________

 

‘An Tuairesgeal

 

TGSI, 34 (1927-1928), 1-112.

 

Prose tale from Eigg, contains three verse ‘runs’: six lines, beginning with ‘Tha mi ‘cur mar chroisean ‘s mar gheasan ort (p. 18);  nine lines, beginning with ‘Biodh d’ aghaidh-sa ris an àirde ‘n iar’ (p. 20); twenty-six lines, beginning

withLéineag phleatach shròil’ (p. 22).

____________

 

Tulach Gorm’.  See: The Keith Norman MacDonald Collection (Puirt-a-Beul)

____________

 

Uamh an Oir.  See: The Frances Tolmie Collection II

____________

 

Uisge-beatha

 

Tocher, 17 (Spring 1975), 12.

 

A quatrain on the evils of whiskey, copied by the Rev. William Matheson from the MSS of Donald Nicolson of Kilmuir, Skye.  There is an English translation.

____________

 

Urnaigh-mhara Shìl-Leòid’.  See: The Kenneth MacLeod Collection

 

 

 

TOP OF PAGE

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Homepage     

 

Poetry   

 

Abbreviations 

 

Traditional: known authorship

A-C       D-Domhnall       Domhnallach-Dz        E–G       H–L       M–MacA       MacB–MacC        MacD        MacE-MacK,  MacLa-MacLeod        MacLeòid A-H        MacLeòid I-Z        MacM-MacN       MacO-MacZ      M      N      O-Q      R-Z

 

Traditional: anonymous

A-B      C-D      E-K      L-N       O       P-Z     

 

Traditional: collections

Annie Arnott       An Cabairneach        Carmina Gadelica        Catriona Dhùghlas        Tormod Domhnallach                  Marjory Kennedy-Fraser         Angus Lamont        K. N. MacDonald         Johan MacInnes          Hugh MacKinnon          Calum I. MacLean         Sorley MacLean        Kenneth MacLeod         Niall MacLeòid        Màiri Nighean Alasdair

Cairistiona Mhàrtainn         Alexander Morison          Kenneth Morrison         Angus Nicolson          Portree HS Magazine   Lachlann Robertson         Frances Tolmie I          Frances Tolmie II

 

Modern

Somhairle MacGill-Eain         The New Poetry

 

References

Books etc: A-L         Books etc: MacA-MacL         Books etc: MacM-Z   Periodicals, MSS, AV

 

Contact

Contact us

 

 

TOP OF PAGE

 

 

 

Prose: homepage

 

Bibliography: homepage

 

© A. Loughran, 2016