Gaelic Literature of the Isle of Skye: an annotated  bibliography   

 

Traditional anonymous poetry and song:  Individual items  E – K

 

 

 

 

 

 

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‘Na h-eich liobhach lairgearach bothar’.  See: ‘Carbad Alaire Chuchuillin

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‘E ho m’ aighean’.  See: The Kennedy-Fraser Collection (Songs of the Hebrides 2)

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Eile na hòraibh o-ho’.  See: The Frances Tolmie Collection I

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Eóghann Bàn’.  See: The Hugh MacKinnon Collection and The Frances Tolmie Collection I

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Faca sibh an t-òg uasal’.  See: The Johan MacInnes Collection

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‘ ‘Fac thu na féidh?’.  See: The Frances Tolmie Collection I

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Fàill ill o-ho-ro’.  See: The Frances Tolmie Collection I

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Fàilte dhuit, deagh shlàinte leat

 

i     Skye: Iochdar-Trotternish and District.  William MacKenzie.  Glasgow: Alex. MacLaren and Sons, 1930, pp. 102-102

 

ii    From the Farthest Hebrides.  Edited by Donald A. Fergusson.  Toronto: Macmillan of Canada, 1978, pp. 158-161

 

A lighthearted song celebrating a famous nineteenth century elopement; that of Donald MacDonald of Monkstadt in Skye and Jessie MacDonald of Balranald in Uist.  The first version is included in William MacKenzie’s account of the affair (MacKenzie 1930:100-104) and the second is from the singing of Mrs. Katie MacAulay, formerly of North Uist.

 

The first version has seven four-line verses and the refrain.  The second version has nine verses and the refrain, with the tune in staff notation.  Composed upon the model of a popular song used by, among others, Màiri Mhor nan Oran

(Meek 1977:84-88).

 

William MacKenzie’s account of the elopement includes fragments of two other songs celebrating the affair: Nuair fhuair an “Eliza” /  Mo Shesie air bòrd’ (q.v.) and ‘ ‘S ùr a’ choill bho ‘n d’ rinn i fàs’ (q.v.).

 

For another account of the elopement; see Coinneach Mac a’ Phearsain’s ‘Domhnall Mhogastad agus Seasaidh Bhaile Raghnaill’ in the section for traditional prose.

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Fàilte dhut is slàinte leat

 

Sruth (12th November 1968), p. 2

 

In the course of his discussion of crafting in Camuscross, Skye, Domhnall Grannd relates how, when the main road was being built, the crofters refused to allow it to run through the village.  The resulting isolation made this a matter of regret for them.  He quotes the refrain of a song compsed about the affair, but does not give any more, for fear of offending the families of some of those involved.

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‘Fear Bhàlai’.  See: The Frances Tolmie Collection I

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‘An Fhideag Airgid’.  See: The Kennedy-Fraser Collection (Songs of the Hebrides 1)

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Fhaoileag Tìre-fo-Thuinn’.  See: The Kennedy-Fraser Collection (From the Hebrides)

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Fhir a dh’ ith an bonnach mór’.  See: The Keith Norman MacDonald Collection (Puirt-a-Beul)

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Fhir a shiùbhlas am bealach’.  See: The Catriona Dhùghlas Collection

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Fhir sin tha thall, ‘an tìr-nan-Athaichean’.  See: ‘Oran do Phrionnsa Teàrlach

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Fhir ud shiùbhlas an rod’.  See: ‘Oran do Mhac-Fhionghain an t-Sratha

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Fhleasgaich mo rùin, ‘s fhearr beachd is tùr’.  See: ‘Gréidhear an Uird

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‘Fire faire! ruagaire’.  See: ‘ ri ribh ó!’ in the Frances Tolmie Collection II

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‘Gaol nam Ban’.  See: The Frances Tolmie Collection II

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Gaoth an iar / Air fiacail Feiste’.  See: ‘Guidhe nan Leòdach

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Ge socrach a tha ‘n leaba so’.  See: ‘Cumha do duine uasal de Chlann-Domhnaill’

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Ghailbh an Gothidh

 

History of the Feuds and Conflicts among the Clans in the Northern Parts of Scotland .  [Hugh MacPherson].  Glasgow: Printed by J. and J. Robertson for John Gillies, Perth, 1780, p. 136.

 

A short poem of three quatrains, beginning with ‘Shin mar huirt Fearr Ruigh ‘n Dunain’.  The could probably refer to Rudh’ an Dùnain in Skye.  A place-name reference in the second quatrain, ‘Chillidh Ruigh’, is more difficult to decipher.  Professor Colm Ó Baoill has suggested to me that it might represent Cill Ma Ruibhe (Kilmaree) with the ‘m’ elided in speech.  The poem’s theme is craving for snuff and the lengths to which people would go in order to satisfy it.  Alexander Nicolson has written about this craving in 17th century Skye (Nicolson 1930:185).

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Gillean mo rùin’.  See: The Annie Arnott Collection

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‘An Gille dubh mo laochan’.  See: The Keith Norman MacDonald Collection (Puirt-a-Beul)

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Giullan geal thù

 

Carmina Gadelica.  Vol. 4. [Edited by James Carmichael Watson].   Edinburgh: Oliver and Boyd, 1941, pp. 316-319.

 

A lullaby recorded from a Barra man in 1870, but the editor notes that references in the text seem to indicate that the subject of the lullaby is a son of MacKinnon of Strath.  There are six strophic stanzas and a refrain.

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Goiridh an coileachan uair roimh

 

i     Journal of the Folk-Song Society, No. 16 (1911) [The Frances Tolmie Collection], 232-233.

 

ii    Scottish Studies, 1 (1957), 103.

 

A matchmaking song, a variety of waulking song, in which the names of young women in the company would be matched with the names of various young men.  The Frances Tolmie version has six single-line verses and the refrain,

with an English translation and the tune in staff notation.  The second version has just the refrain and a single-line verse; it is from James Ross’s article ‘A classification of Gaelic Folk-Song’ (Scottish Studies, 1:95-151).

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Gréidhear an Uird

 

Place-names of Skye and Adjacent Islands.  Alexander R. Forbes.  Paisley: Alexander Gardner, 1923, p. 391.

 

A. R. Forbes notes that one of the minor bards of Sleat composed a poem for the Ord grieve, in gratitude for having been promised a supply of potatoes.  He quotes one of the seven stanzas, beginning with ‘Fhleasgaich mo rùin,

‘s fhearr beachd is tùr’ and notes that it takes the form of a piobaireachd. 

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Griogal Cridhe’.  See: The Kennedy-Fraser Collection (From the Hebrides)

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Gruagach-mhara’.  See: The Kennedy-Fraser Collection (From the Hebrides)

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Gu bheil an gille dubhdhonn’.  See: The Calum I. MacLean Collection

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Guidheam slàn do ‘n ribhinn

 

Gairm, 12 (An Samhradh 1955), 335-337.

 

From Uisdean MacRath, originally of Skye and latterly of Glenorchy.  His version of this song is very close to that in An t-Oranaiche (Mac-na-Ceardadh 1879: 156-157).  There are five four-line verses in a strophic metre with a six-line

refrain.  Iain Whyte’s arrangement of the tune is given in staff notation.

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Guidhe nan Leòdach

 

Carmina Gadelica.  Vol. 5.  Edited by Angus Matheson.  Edinburgh: Oliver and Boyd, 1954, pp. 356-359.

 

A sea song of thirty-four lines, beginning with ‘Gaoth an iar … ‘.  From reciters in Uist, Barra and Kintail.  There is a parallel English translation.

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Gur e bòidheach, gur e bòidheach’.  See: ‘Donull nan Donull’ in the Kennedy-Fraser Collection (Songs of the Hebrides)

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Gur e mise tha fo éislean’.  See: The Calum I. MacLean Collection

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Gur e mistha fo mhulad’.  See: ‘Cumha Peathar’ and ‘Oran do Dho’null Mac-Ionmhuinn’

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Gur e sgeula ar léiridh’.  See: Marbhrann do Shir Seumas MacDhomhnuill Shleibhte

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Gur mise tha trom airtneulach’.  See: ‘Oran an Uachdarain

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‘Ha-rim, Ha-’.  See: The Kennedy-Fraser Collection (Songs of the Hebrides 3)

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‘He ho-li-gan he ho m’ aighear’.  See: ‘A bhò chridheag’ in the Kennedy-Fraser Collection (Songs of the Hebrides 2)

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, manndthu!’.  See: The Frances Tolmie Collection II

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‘Hi éile ’.  See ‘Dh’ fhalbh mo rùn air an aiseag’ in The Calum I. MacLean Collection

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‘Hill-ean is ó hug ù’.  See: The Frances Tolmie Collection II

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Hillin o hi ri horo

 

The MacDonald Collection of Gaelic Poetry.  Edited by the Revs. A. and A. MacDonald.  Inverness: Northern Counties, 1911, p. 265.

 

The editors note on page xlii that this òran luaidh (waulking song) is addressed to an Alexander Nicolson and is probably a Skye composition.  However, ‘Alastair Oigicic Neacail’ (the song’s first line) appears to be a patronymic

and I have found no independent evidence that the song has a Skye provenance.

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‘Hi na hi ri ri u’.  See: The Kennedy-Fraser Collection (From the Hebrides)

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Hin din dan du-i’.  See: ‘Duan an Rathaid’ in the Kennedy-Fraser Collection (Songs of the Hebrides 3)

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Hin, Hin, Haradala’.  See: The Kennedy-Fraser Collection (Songs of the Hebrides 3) and The Keith Norman MacDonald Collection (Puirt-a-Beul)

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‘Hi-u o ro hu o’.  See: ‘Cumha Peathar’

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hil hil é ó’.  See: The Calum I. MacLean Collection

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‘Hi ri ‘m , hi ri hi ù’

 

An Deò-Gréine, 6 (1910-1911), 123.

 

An òran luaidh (waulking song) recorded in Eigg in 1908 by Winifred Parker from Mrs. John MacKinnon.  For a longer, Raasay version of this song, see ‘Tha sgeul ùr air tighinn do ‘n bhaile’ in the Calum I. MacLean Collection.  The Raasay version is in the form of a continuation song and although the way in which the words and music of the Eigg version is printed is confusing in this respect, it is probably also a continuation song.

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‘Hi ri ri ribh o’.  See: The Kennedy-Fraser Collection (From the Hebrides)

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‘Ho Ailleagan’.  See: The Kennedy-Fraser Collection (From the Hebrides)

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‘Ho-an O-an, ars’ an Bàn’.  See: ‘An Bàn’ in the Frances Tolmie Collection I

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, firean forum’.  See: The Frances Tolmie Collection II

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, gur laghach na mnathan

 

Skye: Iochdar-Trotternish and District.  William MacKenzie.  Glasgow: Alex. MacLaren and Sons, 1930, pp. 22-23.

 

Four quatrains of a song about illicit distilling in Maligar when a group of women outwitted the gaugers.

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hor-a-ló ho ’.  See: ‘Bràtaichean na Féinne’ in the Frances Tolmie Collection I

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‘Ho hu ra bhi o hi’.  See: The Kennedy-Fraser Collection (From the Hebrides)

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Hoirionn o ‘s gur mi tha tùirseach

 

TGSI, 52 (1980-1982), 190-191.

 

From Neil J. MacKinnon’s article ‘Strath, Skye – the End of the Nineteenth Century’ (TGSI, 52:155-197).  The song, which bewails a poor summer, came from an old man in Elgol who could only remember part of it and did not know

who had composed it.  There is a refrain and two stanzas, which appear to have been composed upon the same model as Domhnall nan Oran’s

Luinneag Gaol’ (MacLeòid 1811:222-224).

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‘Ho leiba chall o’.  See: The Frances Tolmie Collection II

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Mhórag bheag’.   See: The Frances Tolmie Collection II

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‘Ho! mo leannan’.  See: The Kennedy-Fraser Collection (Songs of the Hebrides 1)

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‘Ho! mo nigh’n dubh / mo nigh’n dubh’.  See: ‘Crònan na Mhaighdinn-mhara’ in the Kennedy-Fraser Collection (Songs of the Hebrides 1)

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‘Ho nan tigeadh / Mo Robairneach gaolach’.  See: ‘Oran Gaoil, le ban-tighearn de theaghlach Shleibhte

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à, nighean ó, nighean donn’.  See: The Calum I. MacLean Collection

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rionn eile’.  See: The Frances Tolmie Collection II

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‘Ho bha hùg óireann ó’.  See ‘Chi mi am bàta a’ dol seachad’ in The Calum I. MacLean Collection

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‘Ho chuir mo leannan cùl rium’.  See: The Calum I. MacLean Collection

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‘Ho ro hi ri ri hiu o’.  See: The Kennedy-Fraser Collection (From the Hebrides)

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‘Ho ro ho ho gu’.  See: The Kennedy-Fraser Collection (From the Hebrides)

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, hùg o, hùg o’.  See: The Frances Tolmie Collection II

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, lail ó’.  See: The Frances Tolmie Collection II

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‘Ho ro Mhàiri Dhubh

 

i    Albyn’s Anthology.  Edited by Alexander Campbell.  Vol. 1.  Edinburgh: Oliver & Boyd, 1816, pp. 54-55.

 

ii  The Gesto Collection of Highland Music.  Compiled by Keith Norman MacDonald.  Leipzig: For the compiler, 1895, p. 19.

 

iii  Celtic Monthly, 4 (1895-1896), 208.

 

A song composed to Mrs. MacPherson of Ostaig to an ancient melody.  The first version has six lines of verse and the refrain ‘Ho ro Mhairi dhu’! tionndaidh rium!’ taken down by Alexander Campbell from the singing of the Misses Annie and Janet MacLeod of Gesto, Skye.  The second version has two extra lines of verse in addition to the Albyn’s Anthology version.  The third version gives the text as part of Malcolm MacFarlane’s introduction to new Gaelic words of his own composition.

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‘Ho-ro-ro-ro-ro leannain thu’.  See: ‘Crònan an Dàin’ in the Kennedy-Fraser Collection (Songs of the Hebrides 2)

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, thùgaibh i’.  See: The Frances Tolmie Collection II

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‘Hug ó rionn ó.  See: The Frances Tolmie Collection II

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Huraibh i huraibh i hao roba’.  See: Oran Leannan-sìdhe’ in the Annie Arnott Collection

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‘Iain Dubh mac Ni’n Ailein

 

TGSI, 30 (1919-1922), 167.

 

Two satirical stanzas composed by a Bracadale man about one of the well Known ‘characters’ that used to wander around Skye.  From J. G. MacKay’s article ‘Social Life in Skye from Legend and Story’ (TGSI, 30:128-174).

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‘Iain Shomalta é ho .  See: The Catriona Dhughlas Collection

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‘ ‘Illean ò, ro mhaith ho!’.  See: The Frances Tolmie Collection II

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‘ ‘Ille bhig, ‘ille bhig

 

Gairm, 129 (An Geamhradh 1984-1985), 53.

 

Fragment of a cradle song, given by Calum MacLeòid of Raasay in his article ‘A’ Chreathail Ghaidhealach’ (Gairm, 129:52-54).

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‘Ill , hill ó, illean is ó.  See: The Frances Tolmie Collection II

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Inghne bhòidheach, nuair bhithinn brònach’.  See: The Kennedy-Fraser Collection (Songs of the Hebrides 3)

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Innsean sgeul air caithream ‘n fhir mhoir’.  See: ‘Dan an Deirg mhic  Druidhinn

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Iomairaibh eutrom’.  See: The Annie Arnott Collection

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Iorram do Dhomhnull Gorm Og’.  See: Taladh Dhomhnaill Ghuirm’

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‘Is daor a cheannaich mi ‘n t-iasgach

 

Scottish Gaelic Studies, 9, Part 1 (April 1961), 1-6

 

Lament for a drowned man, with a tenuous Skye connection.  Calum I. MacLean presents as his principal text a version noted down from Mrs. Patrick MacCormick of Benbecula.  He also gives details of variant readings, including one noted down in Skye by Dr. John MacInnes (p. 6).  This Skye variant includes eight lines not found in any other version.

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Iseabail Og Cheann a’ Chreagain’.  See: The Hugh MacKinnon Collection

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‘Is fada bhuam fhìn bonn Beinn Edra

 

i      Celtic Monthly, 18 (1910), 46.

 

ii     Journal of the Folk-Song Society, No. 16 (1911) [The Frances Tolmie Collection], 186-187.

 

iii    Skye: Iochdar-Trotternish and District.  William Mackenzie.  Glasgow: Alex. MacLaren and Sons, 1930, p. 12.

 

iv   Gairm, 75 (An Samhradh 1971), 232-233.

 

 

Song associated with the Colann gun Cheann legend.  The first version is in the Rev. Niall Ros’s article ‘Ceòl-Mór agus Clann Mhic-Cruimein’ (Celtic Monthly, 18: 26-28, 45-47, 65-67).  Rev. Ros attributes the tune associated with the song to Pàdruig Og MacCruimein.  The poetess Màiri Mhór nan Oran is the source of the second version.

 

William MacKenzie’s notes to the third version attribute both words and tune to a piper, Bruce of Staffin.  The fourth version is in the Rev. Tormod Domhnallach’s article ‘Na h-Onrachdain’ (Gairm, 75:225-240).  He also associates the song with Bruce of Staffin, reputed to have been the last person to see the Colann gun Cheann in Skye.

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‘Is hiùraibh ó chan eil mi slàn’.   See: The Hugh MacKinnon Collection

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‘Is leamsa an long’.  See: ‘Gaisgeach na Sgéithe Deirge’ in the Kenneth MacLeod Collection

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‘Is mise ghabh an t-suaineach’.  See: Cuach Mhic-‘Ill-Andrais

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‘Is toil liom Ailean Dubh a Lochaidh’.   See: the Kennedy-Fraser Collection (Songs of the Hebrides 2), and the Calum I. MacLean Collection

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‘Is toil liom coisiche na frìthe’.  See: The Calum I. MacLean Collection

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‘An Iubhrach ùr’.  See: The Kenneth MacLeod Collection

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Iùraibh o-, iùraibh o-.  See: The Frances Tolmie Collection II

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ri ribh ó!’.  See: The Frances Tolmie Collection II

 

 

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Poetry   

 

Abbreviations 

 

Traditional: known authorship

A-C       D-Domhnall       Domhnallach-Dz        E–G       H–L       M–MacA       MacB–MacC        MacD        MacE-MacK,  MacLa-MacLeod        MacLeòid A-H        MacLeòid I-Z        MacM-MacN       MacO-MacZ      M      N      O-Q      R-Z

 

Traditional: anonymous

A-B      C-D      E-K      L-N       O       P-Z     

 

Traditional: collections

Annie Arnott       An Cabairneach        Carmina Gadelica        Catriona Dhùghlas        Tormod Domhnallach                  Marjory Kennedy-Fraser         Angus Lamont        K. N. MacDonald         Johan MacInnes          Hugh MacKinnon          Calum I. MacLean         Sorley MacLean        Kenneth MacLeod         Niall MacLeòid        Màiri Nighean Alasdair

Cairistiona Mhàrtainn         Alexander Morison          Kenneth Morrison         Angus Nicolson          Portree HS Magazine   Lachlann Robertson         Frances Tolmie I          Frances Tolmie II

 

Modern

Somhairle MacGill-Eain         The New Poetry

 

References

Books etc: A-L         Books etc: MacA-MacL         Books etc: MacM-Z   Periodicals, MSS, AV

 

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