Gaelic Literature of the Isle of Skye: an annotated  bibliography   

 

Traditional anonymous poetry and song:  Individual items  C – D

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Caidealan cuide rium fhìn thu’.  See: The Kennedy-Fraser Collection  (Songs of the Hebrides 2)

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Caidealan m’ eudail, hó-ro eile’.  See: ‘Taladh’ in the Kenneth MacLeod Collection

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Cailleach liath Rarsaidh’.  See: The Keith Norman MacDonald Collection (Puirt-a-Beul)

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‘Calum beag, Mac Ruari Mhaoir’.  See: ‘Port Dhomhnaill Mhic Guthagain’ in the Keith Norman MacDonald Collection (Gesto Collection;  Puirt-a-Beul)

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Caoidh an Eich-uisge’.   See: The Frances Tolmie Collection I

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Caoidh Leannain’.  See: The Frances Tolmie Collection I

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Caoidh Màthar’.   See: The Frances Tolmie Collection I

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‘Carbad Alaire Chuchuillin

 

Leabhar na Feinne.  Edited by J. F. Campbell.  Vol. 1.  London: Spottiswoode and Co., 1872, pp. 2-3.

 

A fragment of seven lines, beginning with ‘Na h-eich liobhach lairgearach Bothar’.  Got by Alexander Carmichael in 1862 from Eachann Domhnallach of Talisker, who apparently learnt it from his father, Iain Mac Iain ‘ic Eòghainn who was probably the brother of the poet Raonull Domhnallach (q.v.).

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Casag lachduinn Ruairidh Ruaidh’.  See: The Keith Norman MacDonald Collection (Puirt-a-Beul)

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‘Cha b’ é ‘n ainnis’.  See: ‘Bean Mhic a’ Mhaoir’ (i) in The Frances Tolmie Collection I

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‘Cha bhì mi buan is tu bhì bhuam’.  See: The Catriona Dhùghlas Collection and  the Calum I. MacLean Collection

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‘Cha dean mise car a chaoidh’.  See: The Frances Tolmie Collection I

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‘Cha d’fhuair mi ‘n cadal an raoir’.  See: ‘Ill iu, hill o, illean is o’ in The Frances Tolmie Collection I

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‘Cha dìrich mi an t-uchd le fonn

 

Scottish Studies, 1 (1957), 106

 

From James Ross’s article ‘A Classification of Gaelic Folk-song’ (Scottish Studies, 1:95-151).  Five lines of a Skye ‘pregnancy’ song in which the girl declares that the father of her unborn child is no common lad, but a great hero.  A fuller version of this song was collected in South Uist by Donald MacCormick (Campbell and  Collinson 1969:114-117, 305-307)

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‘Cha dìrich mi ‘n gleannan’.  See: The Johan MacInnes Collection

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Chaidh Fionn is Oscar is Mac Morn’.  See: ‘Làmh-fhad’

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Chaidh mi le ‘m leannan a’s t-foghar

 

The Traditional and National Music of Scotland.  Francis Collinson.  London: Routledge and Kegan Paul, 1966, pp. 83-84.

 

A spinning song from Mrs. Katherine Douglas (Catriona Dhùghlas) of Kilmuir.  Two line-verses and a vocable refrain, along with an English translation and the music in staff notation.

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Chaidh mi ‘na ghleannan a’s t-fhoghair’.  See: ‘Oran Teannachaidh’ in The Frances Tolmie Collection II

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Chaidh mis’ dh’ an tràigh’.  See: The Frances Tolmie Collection I

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Chaidh mo Dhunnchadh bheinn

 

i     Tocher, 36-37 (1981-1982), 390-391

 

ii    Orain an Eilein.  Cairistiona Mhàrtainn.  An t-Eilean Sgiatheanach: Taigh na Teud, 2001, p. 100

 

iii   An Gaidheal, 35 (1939-1940), 77

 

iv   TGSI, 39-40 (1942-1950), 191

 

The first version is a transcription of a School of Scottish Studies recording (SA 1951/3 A5), recorded from Dr Allan MacDonald of Strath, Skye by Alan Lomax.  It is the lament of a woman whose son has been killed by his stepfather. 

There is an English translation, with notes and the music in staff notation.  The second version is from Janet MacLeod who got it from Dr. MacDonald.  The third version is from Catriona Dhùghlas and the fourth version from Calum I. MacLean.

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Chaidh na fir a Sgathabheig’.  See: The Frances Tolmie Collection I

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Chailin òig, an stiùir thu mi?’.  See: ‘Nighean Righ Eireann’ in The Kenneth MacLeod Collection

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Chaitriona nach till thu idir’.  See: The Hugh MacKinnon Collection

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‘Cha ‘n eil bàta ho-ri’.  See: ‘Caoineadh-mara’ in The Kennedy-Fraser Collection (Songs of the Hebrides 2)

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‘Cha ‘n fhaigh duine Màigean’.  See: The Frances Tolmie Collection I

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‘Chan e caoidh Mhic Shiridh’.   See: ‘Cumha Peathar’

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Chaorain nach dean thu solus dhomh’.  See: ‘Oran mu ‘n Ghruagaich’ in the Frances Tolmie Collection II

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‘Cha robh cleas a dheanadh sgiataiche no sgoitiche’.  See: The Kenneth MacLeod Collection

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‘Cha tig Mór, mo bhean, dhachaidh

 

i     An Duanaire.  Edited by Donald MacPherson.  Edinburgh: MacLachlan and Stewart, 1868, pp. 34-35

 

ii    The Highlander (30th December 1876)

 

iii   TGSI, 15 (1888-1889), p. 307

 

iv    Mac-Talla (28th April 1899), p. 307

 

v     The MacDonald Collection of Gaelic Poetry.  Edited by the Revs. A. and A. MacDonald.  Inverness: Northern Counties, 1911, p. 328

 

vi   Tocher, 4 (1971), 120-123

 

vii   Tocher, 22 (1976), 222-223

 

viii   From the Farthest Hebrides.  Edited by Donald A. Fergusson.  Toronto: MacMillan of Canada, 1978, pp. 190-191

 

ix    Orain an Eilein.  Cairistiona Mhàrtainn.  An t-Eilean Sgiatheanach: Taigh na Teud, 2002, p. 99

 

x    ibid

 

A poignant lullaby, as if sung by a widower to his motherless child.  Metrically similar to ‘Crodh Chailein’.  The fifth version (in the MacDonald Collection) listed here is the first printed version to point to a Skye provenance for the song. 

It has the lines ‘Tha mo Mhór-sa ‘n Dunbheagain / ‘S cha fhreagair i ‘n glaodh’.  The last two versions listed are in a collection of Skye songs.

 

There are two versions from Skye singers on record in the Sound Archives of the School of Scottish Studies in the University of Edinburgh (SA 1954/69/B4; SA 1953/176/3).

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‘Cha tòir Iain Mór a nighean dhomh.  See: The Keith Norman MacDonald Collection (Puirt-a-Beul)

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Cheud latha dhe na bhliadhna’.  See: ‘Oran na Feannaig

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Chì mi am bàta a’ dol seachad’.   See: The Calum I. MacLean Collection

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Chì mi ‘n t-àit’ ‘s an robh mi ‘n uiridh’.  See: ‘Iùraibh o-, iùraibh o-’ in the Frances Tolmie Collection II

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‘ ‘Chraobh an iubhair’.  See: The Frances Tolmie Collection I

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Chuala mi do ghlaodhsa bhruthaich’.   See: ‘Oran Leannan-sìdhe’ in the Annie Arnott Collection

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Chuala mi sgeul ga innse ac’ ‘.  See: Marbhrann do Sheumas Domhnullach, fear Sceaboist

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Chuir mi biodag anns a’ bhodach’.  See: The Keith Norman MacDonald Collection (Puirt-a-Beul)

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Chuisil ó, chuisil éile

 

TGSI, 49 (1974-1976), 389

 

Fragment of a song, mentioned by Sorley MacLean in his article ‘Some Raasay Traditions’ (TGSI, 49:377-397)

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Chunnaic mi coigreach an ’.  See: ‘Duan na h-Aoigheachd’ in the  Kenneth MacLeod Collection

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Chunnaic mise ‘s mi ‘nam chadal

 

TGSI, 49 (1974-1976), 341

 

From Donald Eachann Meek’s article ‘Gaelic Poets of the Land Agitation (TGSI, 49:309-375).  It was noted down about 1973 by Miss Jo MacDonald from the Rev. Donald Budge.  It has some striking imagery: in the first stanza the Fenians come over from Ireland to behead the hated sheep and in the second stanza there is the image of Kenneth MacLeod of Gesto surrounded by flames and being pursued by a large crowd.  There are two eight-line stanzas in a cumha metre.

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Ciad furan ‘s ciad fàilte

 

TGSI, 49 (1974-1976), 389

 

From Sorley MacLean’s article ‘Some Raasay Traditions’ (TGSI, 49:377-397).  A song addressed to a daughter of MacKinnon of Strath, which he got from his aunt, Peggie MacLean.  There are eight verse-couplets and a vocable refrain repeated after each line.

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Ciad soraidh bhuam fhìn gu m’ eòlas’.  See: ‘Oran Mór Sgoirebreac

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Ciad soraidh bhuam thar m’ eòlas.  See: ‘Oran do Throtornish

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an fhidheall’.  See: The Annie Arnott Collection

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Ciod é ‘ghaoil’.  See: The Frances Tolmie Collection I

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Clò nan Gillean’.  See: The Frances Tolmie Collection I

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bu deis air an ùrlar’.  See: The Kennedy-Fraser Collection (From the Hebrides)

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‘Co-dhiubh, thogainn fonn mo leannain’.  See: The Angus Lamont Collection

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Coisich a rùin

 

i     Journal of the Folk-Song Society, No. 16 (1911) [The Frances Tolmie Collection], 211-213

 

ii    TGSI, 49 (1974-1976), 391-392

 

The first version was noted by Frances Tolmie from the singing of Margaret Macleod of Portree.  There are twenty-seven single-line verses and a vocable refrain, with the music in staff notation.

 

The second version, with twenty-one single-line verses and a vocable refrain, is in Sorley MacLean’s article ‘Some Raasay Traditions’ (TGSI, 49:377-397).  He got this version from his aunt, Peggie MacLean.

 

For other versions, from outwith Skye and Raasay, see The MacDonald Collection of Gaelic Poetry (MacDonald 1911:258-260), and the second volume of Hebridean Folksongs (Campbell and Collinson 1977:144-150, 333-338). 

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Colann gun Cheann’.  See: ‘Is fada bhuam fhìn bonn Beinn Edra

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Comhairl’ Oisein dhaMhàthar’.  See: The Frances Tolmie Collection I

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Crodh Chailein’.  See: The Frances Tolmie Collection I

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Cruinneag na Buaile’.  See: The Johan MacInnes Collection

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Cuach Mhic-‘Ill-Andrais

 

An t-Oranaiche.  Edited by Gilleasbuig Mac-an-Ceardadh.  Glasgow: Archibald Sinclair, 1879, pp. 476-479.

 

This poem uses stanzas four to six of Raonull Domhnallach’s (Raonull Mac Iain ‘ic Eoghainn’s) ‘Oran an Uisge-bheatha(q.v.) and adds nine other stanzas describing a drunken spree.  It has to be said that it is inferior to Raonull Mac Iain’s original.  There are twelve eight-line stanzas, beginning with ‘Is mise ghabh an t-suaineach’ in an irregular amhran metre.

 

In Strath: In Isle of Skye the Rev. D. Lamont writes that the composer of ‘Cuach Mhic-‘Ill-Andrais’ was a Strath man, his information coming from the composer’s grandson (Lamont 1913:126).  Unfortunately Rev. Lamont does not give the name of either the composer or his grandson.

 

A three-stanza song entitled ‘Oran na Pòite Duibhe’, which is a composite of Parts of ‘Cuach Mhic-‘Ill-Andrais’ is in Gaelic Songs of Nova Scotia (Creighton  and MacLeod 1964:74-75).

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An Bàn’.  See: The Frances Tolmie Collection I

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An Cùbhrachan’.  See: The Frances Tolmie Collection I

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Cùl an tomain, bràigh an tomain’.  See: Buain na Rainich

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Cùl r m’ leannan ‘s e chuir mi ‘n diugh’.  See: The Calum I. MacLean  Collection

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‘Cumha an Eich-uisge’.  See: ‘A Mhor, a Mhor, till ri d’ mhacan

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‘Cumha Bantraich’.  See: The Frances Tolmie Collection I

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‘Cumha do duine uasal de Chlann-Domhnaill’

 

Comhchruinneachadh Ghlinn-a-Bhàird.  Edited by the Rev. A. MacLean Sinclair.  Charlottetown, P.E. Island; G. Herbert Haszard, 1890, pp. 368-370.

 

The Rev. MacLean Sinclair identifies the subject of this lament as Alexander MacDonald of Kingsburgh, who was killed at the Battle of Killiecrankie in 1689.  He was the son of the great Clan Donald hero, Domhnall mac Iain ‘ic Sheumais.

 

There are ten six-line stanzas, beginning with ‘Ge socrach a tha ‘n leaba so’.  The fifth and sixth lines of each stanza are repeated twice.  The metre is strophic, but the stress count is variable.

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‘Cumha do dh-Iain Og Scalpa

 

Comhchruinneachadh Ghlinn-a-Bhàird.  Edited by the Rev. A. MacLean Sinclair.  Charlottetown, P.E. Island; G. Herbert Haszard, 1890, pp. 292-295.

 

The lament is attributed to the sister of Iain Og.  Who he was, and whether the Scalpa concerned is of Harris or Skye is difficult to determine.  There are references to what would appear to be members of cadet families of the MacLeods of Skye, but I have been unable to identify them.  There are eleven eight-line stanzas, beginning with ‘S e ‘n sgeul a fhuair mi ‘n drasta’ in a poorly executed cumha metre.

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‘Cumha do Mhinisteir a Chaidh a Bhàthadh’.  See: ‘Cumha Peathar’

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‘Cumha Iain Ghairbh’.  See entry for Nighean Mhic Ghille Chaluim in section for poetry and song of known authorship.

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‘Cumha Lachlainn Mhàrtainn’

 

i    Skye: Iochdar-Trotternish and District.  William MacKenzie.  Glasgow: Alex. MacLaren and Sons, 1930, pp. 54-56

 

ii   Gairm, 55 (An Samhradh 1966), 206-207

 

Lachlann Màrtainn was one of the victims of a double tragedy which followed a 19th century wedding in Snizort, Skye.  The second version is from the Rev. Tormod Domhnallach’s article ‘Na Buidsichean’ (Gairm, 55:203-209).  His account of the background to the lament is substantially the same as William MacKenzie’s, except for the fact that he suggests supernatural forces to have been the cause.

 

William MacKenzie gives three stanzas of the lament, beginning with ‘Bho thaobh an Ear Thròndairnis’.  The Rev. Domhnallach gives one stanza, beginning with ‘ an teaghlach air fàs tana’ which bears some resemblance to William

MacKenzie’s second stanza.  The metre is a cumha.

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‘Cumha Mhic Ghille Chaluim Ratharsaidh’.  See entry for Nighean Mhic Ghille Chaluim in section for poetry and song of known authorship.

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‘Cumha Peathar’

‘Cumha do Mhinisteir a Chaidh a Bhàthadh

 

i     The MacDonald Collection of Gaelic Poetry.  Edited by the Revs. A. and A. MacDonald.  Inverness: Northern Counties, 1911, pp. 172-173.

 

ii    Orain an Eilein.  Cairistiona Mhàrtainn.  An t-Eilean Sgiatheanach: Taigh na Teud, 2001, p. 97.

 

The Revs. A. and A. MacDonald note (on p. xxxi) that these two laments have in time become associated with each other.  They do not mention a Skye connection, but ‘Cumha Peathar’ is almost identical to ‘Cumha Bhràithrean’ in

Frances Tolmie’s Collection (Journal of the Folk-Song Society, 16:202.  Miss Tolmie’s version came from Janet Anderson, a native of Strath, Skye. 

 

Furthermore, Flora MacNeill has recorded a lament, ‘Chan e caoidh Mhic Shiridh’ (Craobh nan Ubhal. Temple Records, 1981), which includes elements from both laments in the MacDonald Collection and which is described in the sleeve notes as a Skye version of a song once known throughout the Hebrides. 

 

‘Cumha Peathar’ has fifteen verse-couplets beginning with ‘Gur e mistha fo mhulad’ and a vocable refrain.  ‘Cumha do Mhinisteir a Chaidh a Bhàthadh’ has ten verse-couplets beginning with ‘ ‘Mhuire ‘s mistha fo mhulad’ with a vocable refrain.  The version in Orain an Eilein, entitled ‘Hi-u o ro hu o’, has thirteen verse-couplets beginning with ‘Chan e cumha mac tèile’.  It came from Eòin Domhnallach.

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‘Cumha Sheathain’.  See: ‘Seathan Mac Righ Eireann

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‘Cum na gealladh e’

 

The MacDonald Collection of Gaelic Poetry.  Edited by the Revs. A. and A. MacDonald.  Inverness: Northern Counties, 1911, p. 248.

 

In a note on p. xi the editors write that this waulking song is probably an Eigg composition.  There are eighteen half-lines with a non-vocable refrain.  The text appears to be fragmentary and resembles part of another song on pp. 254-257 of the same publication.  See also a song ‘Nighean ud thall, bheil thu ‘t fhaireachadh?’ in Hebridean Folksongs (Campbell and Collinson 1969: 50-53, 163).

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Dàn an Deirg mhic Druidhinn

 

An Original Collection of the Poems of Ossian, Orrann, Ulin and Other Bards    Edited by Hugh and John M’Callum.  Montrose: James Watt for the editors, 1816, pp. 95-105.

 

290 lines beginning ‘Innseam sgeul air caithream ‘n fhir mhoir’.  From Donnchadh MacMhathain of Snizort in Skye.  See also ‘Dearg Mac Deirg gur mise bhean’.

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Dannsaidh na coilich dhubh’.  See: The Keith Norman MacDonald Collection (Puirt-a-Beul)

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Daor-i-itil aor ann’.  See: The Keith Norman MacDonald Collection (Puirt-a-Beul)

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‘Dean Cadalan’.  See: The Frances Tolmie Collection I

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Dearg Mac Deirg gura mi do bhean’.  See: ‘Laoidh Dhiarmaid’

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Dearg Mac Deirg gur mise bhean’.  See: ‘Laoidh Dhiarmaid’

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Deoch-slàinte Mhr. Uisdean’.   See: Oran Molaidh do dh’ Uisdean Domhnullach’

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Dhannsamaid le Ailean’.  See: The Annie Arnott Collection

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‘Dh’ éirich mi maduinn na féile

 

TGSI, 52 (1980-1982), 189-190.

 

From Neil J. MacKinnon’s article ‘Strath, Skye – the End of the Nineteenth Century’ (TGSI. 52:155-197).  Transcribed from the singing of Norman MacDonald, Tormod Lachlainn, of Glas na Cille.  The song of a man beset on every side by creditors.  There are thirteen verse-couplets and a refrain of mixed vocables and text.

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‘Dh’ éirich mi moch maduinn earraich

 

Scottish Studies, 5 (1961), 106-108.

 

Song about a disaster at sea.  Presented by John MacInnes, who noted it down in Skye in 1947 from the dictation of Neil MacInnes (1862-1950.  Dr. MacInnes believed it to be the first time it had been collected and thought that it might be dated to the early seventeenth century.  The vocable refrain ‘Ó hi eile‘ is sung after each half-line.

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‘Dh’ fhalbh an Triùir Mhaighdinnean’.  See: The Frances Tolmie Collection I

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‘Dh’ fhalbh mo rùn air an aiseag’.  See: The Johan MacInnes Collection and the Calum I. MacLean Collection

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‘Dh’ fhalbh mo rùn bho na chala’.  See: The Johan MacInnes Collection

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‘Dh’ fhalbh mo rùn, i ù’.  See: The Angus Lamont Collection

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‘Diùram’

 

An Deò-Gréine, 6 (1910-1911), 193-194.

 

Two different versions of the song are given, both beginning with ‘ ‘S gur e Diùran mac ‘ighne ni’ Lachlainn ‘ic Ruari’.  The first was collected by Winifred Parker from Mrs. John MacKinnon of Eigg in 1908.  According to Mrs. MacKinnon the

song was composed by the sweetheart of Diùram, a soldier who went to America. 

There are eight lines and a refrain.

 

The second version was taken down by the Rev. Kenneth MacLeod from Donald MacLeod of Eigg and Kate Gillies of Drynoch who had heard the song in Canna.  The Rev. MacLeod believed the song to be a Jacobite one.  There are fifteen lines and a refrain.

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‘An Domhnallach Furanach

 

i       An t-Oranaiche.  Edited by Gilleasbuig Mac-na-Ceardadh.  Glasgow: Archibald Sinclair, 1879, pp. 467-469

 

ii      Mac-Talla (7th July 1894), p. 8

 

iii     MacDonald Bards from Mediaeval Times.  Keith Norman MacDonald.  Edinburgh: Norman Macleod, 1900, p. 104

 

iv      The Gesto Collection of Highland Music.  Compiled by Keith Norman MacDonald.  Leipzig: for the compiler, 1895, App. p. 36

 

The first and second versions are entitled ‘An Domhnullach Urramach’.  There is nothing in the first version to suggest a Skye connection, but a note to the second version states that it was composed by Flori Dhomhnullach of Tota Raonuill in Skye for ‘Mac Fir an Ath-Leathainn’, who was a captain in the army.  He deserted her and it affected her mind.

 

In a note to the third version Keith Norman MacDonald writes that it was composed for Colonel Alexander MacDonald of Lynedale by an unknown Skye girl.  The fourth version is identical to it.  Dr. MacDonald got this version from a native of Skye.

 

The first version has sixteen four-line verses and a refrain; the remaining versions have ten verses and a refrain.  The metre is strophic.

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An Domhnullach Urramach’.  See: ‘An Domhnallach Furanach

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Domhnul Ruadh Gaolach

 

A Treatise on the Language, Poetry, and Music of the Highland Clans.  Donald Campbell.  Edinburgh: D. R. Collie and Son, 1862, pp. 199-201.

 

Donald Campbell recalls having heard as a boy a song about an expedition of Skyemen on their way to join the army of Montrose.  He admits to having forgotten both words and melody and what we have here would appear to be his recreation of the song.  It is in continuation form, with the second line of each couplet being repeated as the first line of the next, and there is a vocable refrain.  In the Gillies Collection there is a song of the same name and in the same metre (Gillies 1786:283-284).

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Donull Gorm’.  See: Taladh Dhomhnaill Ghuirm’

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Duan an Deòiridh’.  See: The Kenneth MacLeod Collection

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Duan na h-Aoigheachd’.  See: The Kenneth MacLeod Collection

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Duaran agus Goll’.  See: The Kenneth Morrison Collection

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An Dubh Ghleannach’.  See: The Hugh MacKinnon Collection

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Dubhan bradach, Driamlach robach’.  See: ‘Rann Iasgaich’ in the Kennedy-Fraser Collection (Songs of the Hebrides)

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Dùn nan dùn, Dùn Cana’

 

Gairm, 96 (Am Foghar 1976), 372.

 

Four lines of verse which he learnt from his father and quoted by Uisdean MacAsgaill in his article ‘Fo Sgàile Ghlamaig’ (Gairm, 96:359-371).

 

 

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Abbreviations 

 

Traditional: known authorship

A-C       D-Domhnall       Domhnallach-Dz        E–G       H–L       M–MacA       MacB–MacC        MacD        MacE-MacK,  MacLa-MacLeod        MacLeòid A-H        MacLeòid I-Z        MacM-MacN       MacO-MacZ      M      N      O-Q      R-Z

 

Traditional: anonymous

A-B      C-D      E-K      L-N       O       P-Z     

 

Traditional: collections

Annie Arnott       An Cabairneach        Carmina Gadelica        Catriona Dhùghlas        Tormod Domhnallach                  Marjory Kennedy-Fraser         Angus Lamont        K. N. MacDonald         Johan MacInnes          Hugh MacKinnon          Calum I. MacLean         Sorley MacLean        Kenneth MacLeod         Niall MacLeòid        Màiri Nighean Alasdair

Cairistiona Mhàrtainn         Alexander Morison          Kenneth Morrison         Angus Nicolson          Portree HS Magazine   Lachlann Robertson         Frances Tolmie I          Frances Tolmie II

 

Modern

Somhairle MacGill-Eain         The New Poetry

 

References

Books etc: A-L         Books etc: MacA-MacL         Books etc: MacM-Z   Periodicals, MSS, AV

 

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